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Thread: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

  1. #226
    littleroundman is offline Administrator
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Don’t let your heart be blackmailed

    July 2013: SCAMwatch is again warning those looking for love online to stay on the lookout for scammers.

    SCAMwatch continues to receive complaints about scammers targeting the lonely hearted online, using fake profiles on genuine internet dating sites and online forums to form a relationship with an unsuspecting victim. Once trust is gained, the scammer quickly attempts to move the victim away from the site and its security to communicate and manipulate them into handing over money.

    In a new twist, scammers are blackmailing victims by threatening to send potentially compromising photos or videos to their family and friends if money is not transferred immediately. Scammers will capture photos or videos from webcam chats with the victim and then threaten to post them on public sites. If the scammer has access to their victim’s social network profile, they will also threaten to send the link to the victim’s family and friends. If the victim pays, the scammer may demand further payment before removing the image or video.

    Scammers have a cold heart and will not hesitate to blackmail those seeking love online. Avoid a broken heart, financial losses and embarrassment – don’t share intimate photos or videos with someone that you don’t know and trust.


    How these scams work

    • You meet someone online, such as through a dating or social networking website, whom you seem to ‘connect’ with. The person may claim to have similar likes and dislikes or have gone through similar experiences.
    • Once they have built up trust and a rapport with you – which can take just a few weeks or several months – they profess to have strong feelings for you.
    • They invite you to communicate with them via a webcam. If you agree to chat, they may ask you to share or do something intimate.
    • After the video chat, the scammer informs you that they recorded the chat sessions without your knowledge. They then demand payment, threatening to share the footage with your family and friends via your social networking profile.
    • The scammer may have already posted the video live on public sites and will demand payment in order to remove the footage. The scammer may demand several payments before the footage is taken down.
    • If you don’t send money, the scammer may become more persistent or direct.

    Protect yourself

    • Keep your personal details personal: Never share personal information or photos with someone you don’t know and trust. Be particularly wary if someone invites you to communicate via webcam – these days, it’s easy to record live footage.
    • Watch out: if an online admirer asks to communicate with you outside the dating website, such as through a private email address or over the phone, be wary – they could be a scammer.
    • Think twice: Never send money to a stranger via money order, wire transfer or international funds transfer – it’s rare to recover money sent this way.
    • Report: If you think you have provided your account details to a scammer, contact your bank or financial institution immediately.


    ScamWatch
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

  2. #227
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Police scareware scam continues to target Australians

    March 2013: SCAMwatch is urging people to continue to be alert to a scareware scam where scammers posing as the Australian Federal Police (AFP) try to scare you into handing over money to regain control of your computer.

    A SCAMwatch alert on this scam was previously issued in October 2012, yet contacts to the ACCC have continued to increase since the beginning of the year.

    This scam involves internet users finding that their computer has been frozen, with a pop-up alert appearing on their screen. The alert claims to be from the AFP and states that the user’s computer has been locked because they have visited an illegal website or breached various laws. The scammer claims that they will unlock the computer if a fee is paid.

    The AFP does not solicit funds and this message is not associated with the AFP in any way.

    Don’t let a scammer ransom you – if you pay, you are not guaranteed that you will regain control of your computer and there will likely be significant data losses once the virus is removed or computer unlocked.


    How these scams work

    • You visit a website or receive an email that scammers have infected with scareware.
    • Out of the blue, your computer freezes and you receive a pop-up alert from what appears to be a reputable authority such as the Australian Federal Police. The alert may include a police logo to make it appear legitimate.
    • The alert states that your computer has been frozen because you have violated a law or visited an illegal website. Common claims made by the scammers are that you have violated laws around privacy, copyright or child pornography.
    • In order to unlock the computer, you are instructed to pay a ’fine’ – usually $100 or $199 – using a prepaid money service. These services involve you purchasing a money voucher from a store, which can then be used to make online payments.
    • If you pay, the scammers may or may not unlock your computer. Even if you do regain access to your computer, malware may continue to operate so that the scammers can use your personal and financial details to commit fraud.

    Protect yourself

    • Be wary about which websites you visit and do not open emails from unknown senders – emails may contain malware and some sites may automatically download malicious software on your computer.
    • Before you download a file, make sure it is from a reputable source. If the file, is a program (for example, the file name ends with .exe) make sure you know exactly what it will do.
    • Always keep your computer security up to date with anti-virus and anti-spyware software and a good firewall. Only buy computer and anti-virus software from a reputable source.
    • Be careful what you store on your computer – if a scammer gains access to your personal data, they can use it to steal your identity and your money. If you think your computer has been infected, contact your bank or financial institution immediately and change your passwords.
    • If you receive a pop up alert and are unable to perform any functions on your computer, it may have been infected and you might need a computer specialist to remove the malware. If you are able to perform some security functions on your computer, use your security software to run a virus check.
    • If you have received this scam, unfortunately your computer’s security has been compromised. Even if you have managed to regain control of your computer – whether by your own means or by paying the scammer – it could still be infected with malware. Use your security software to run a virus check but if you have any doubts, contact your anti-virus software provider or a computer specialist.

    ScamWatch
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

  3. #228
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    A squalid zoo in China has tried to fool visitors by pretending dogs are lions and rats are snakes.

    The wildlife park in Luohe, Henan province has infuriated visitors by trying to say fluffy Tibetan mastiff dogs are "African lions".

    There are also dogs pretending to be wolves and leopards, as well as sea cucumbers posing as pythons.

    One visitor Liu Wen said: "I had my young son with me so I tried to play along and told him it was a special kind of lion. But then the dog barked and he knew straight away what it was and that I'd lied to him.

    "How can they tell such dreadful tales and expect to get away with it?"

    Another visitor complained: "I don't know how they've got the nerve to try it. They must think we are all stupid."

    The zoo has sparked outrage, not only at the mix-up, but at the dank and miserable conditions the animals are kept in.

    A spokesperson for the zoo admitted that they used domestic animals because they could not afford the real thing.

    "We're doing our best in tough economic times," he said. "If anyone is unhappy with our displays we will give back their money."

    The Chinese government has banned animal shows, only allowing them on a non-profit basis. Because of this, many zoos in the country are struggling to keep their animals.

    Check out all the latest News, Sport & Celeb gossip at Mirror.co.uk Zoo in China tries to pass dogs off as LIONS - Mirror Online
    Follow us: @DailyMirror on Twitter | DailyMirror on Facebook


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  4. #229
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Business loses $18k in email intercept scam
    By Lincoln Tan
    8:20 AM Friday Aug 16, 2013

    New Zealand companies are being warned of a new business to business email intercept scam after one Auckland business was defrauded of more than $18,000 in their payment for supplies to a South Korean company.

    Michelle Millington, manager of Nuklear Limited, said fraudsters intercepted email correspondence between her company and its Korean suppliers and changed the banking instructions on the invoice.

    An invoice for US$15,250 sent from the email address of the Korean-based supplier last month advised that payment should be made to a London-based bank instead of the usual Korean bank account.

    "We have been dealing with the supplier mainly via email and we have no reason to believe that this instruction isn't genuine," said Millington, whose company manufactures mirror demisters.

    "When the suppliers contacted us to say they did not receive the money when our goods were ready for dispatch, we realised we had been scammed."

    Netsafe told Millington it was the fourth time the cyber security organisation had been made aware of hacked supplier communications from people dealing with overseas companies.

    Chris Hails, cyber security manager said advised Millington to contact the bank for assistance to trace, restore and revoke the payment, and also make a police report.

    "But given the cross-border nature and involvement of tecnology, it can be hard to get anything resolved," Hails said.

    "We would recommend a full security audit of systems and email accounts to ensure no one retains access on your end."

    The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment said it was aware of scams involving scammers intercepting business to business emails.

    However, it did not have records on how much money have been lost to such scams as its consumer affairs arm did not collect comprehensive statistics on scams.

    "We recommend anyone looking to make purchases online does research into the company they are purchasing from," a ministry spokeswoman said.

    "People should become suspicious if their supplier's details change, such as bank account details and they should contact the company directly to confirm any changes."

    The ministry runs an online information service, called Scamwatch, aimed at educating people on how to avoid being scammed and what to do if they were victims.

    Kenny Jeong, New Zealand representative of Korea's Small and Medium Business Administration, said the email intercept scam was not unique to just people dealing with businesses in South Korea.

    "I had a similar experience with an Australian buyer two months ago after my email was attacked by a scammer and bank account details changed," said Jeong.

    "The Korean company shouldn't be blamed here, but the lesson is that people have to take extra care when dealing with anyone overseas."

    Jeong advised that email passwords should be changed at least once a month as a precaution.

    Business loses $18k in email intercept scam - Business - NZ Herald News
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  5. #230
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    mart About Money: Red Flags of a Scam
    By Nick Maffeo

    Sometimes it seems as if there are people in the world who actually have nothing to do all day and all night but think up scams to steal money from complete strangers.

    Besides being international criminals, these scammers are heartless in the way they target people with highly emotional appeals, which run the gamut from love of family to the dream of winning a life-changing fortune.

    And in case you think a scammer could never “get” you, the reality is that there is some situation that has the potential to get almost anyone. What can you do to protect yourself, a family member or a friend?

    While there are many common threads, scams come in every variety and permutation. But there are two red flags present in almost every scam.

    If you simply decide in advance how you will act if you are confronted with either or both of these red flags, you may save yourself from ever becoming a victim.

    The first red flag of a scam? Whatever the situation is, it’s unexpected.

    An unexpected phone call about a family member in danger. An unexpected email about a large lottery win — especially for a lottery you’re pretty sure you never entered. An unexpected offer to make some easy money cashing a check for a stranger. An unexpected business opportunity. Unexpected is the key word.

    Anything involving unexpected heightened emotions — especially with a complete stranger in the mix in any way — should be immediately suspect. And chances are very, very good that a call from someone claiming to be a family member in trouble is probably from a scammer, especially if your caller ID shows a phone number you don’t recognize.

    The second red flag of a scam? You are told to keep something secret.

    A local woman recently wrote a letter to this paper about her experience with a scammer. The caller claimed to be her grandson. He said he had been in a car accident in another country and needed money to pay the hospital. And here it comes: He told her not to call “his mother” because the news would “upset her.”

    Luckily, this woman’s friend and a local Rite Aid employee convinced her to break that promise and call her daughter. She learned that her real grandson was safe and sound at work right in town. Keeping a cool head and being willing to take objective advice kept a thief from getting $2,800 of her savings.

    If anyone, anytime, anywhere tries to get you to wire money quickly — without thinking and in secret — or if you feel threatened in any way, take a breath, take five minutes. Then call the local police fraud team. Or call the branch manager of your bank. Or both. If a scammer is trying to take advantage of you, the police and your bank will be delighted to help keep you from becoming a victim. Give them the chance!

    Smart About Money: Red Flags of a Scam | Canton Citizen
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  6. #231
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    A nationwide mystery shopper scam is misusing a North Carolina business name.

    The Better Business Bureau says people are getting a letter asking them to be a mystery shopper for Bernhardt Company or BFC Produce and BFC." Bernhardt, a furniture manufacturer based out of Lenior, does not hire mystery shoppers. The letters include a bad check for around $2,000s, and they tell you to spend some of that money for shopping and send the rest back to them. David Dalrymple, President of the Northwest BBB, "its really very simple they are trying to get you to pass a bad check." The BBB says reputable mystery shopping companies are not going to randomly select someone to do work for them. In fact a mystery shopping company will actually interview you for the job, face to face, not through the mail or internet.

    Read More at: Mystery Shopper Scam - WLOS News13 - Top Stories

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    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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  7. #232
    littleroundman is offline Administrator
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Web blackmail boy killed himself: UK cops

    AAP August 16, 2013, 5:42 am

    A teenage boy in Scotland killed himself after being targeted by online blackmailers, British police say.

    The 17-year-old, from Fife, is thought to have fallen victim to a scam where internet users are lured into online chats and then blackmailed with the footage.

    The teenager is said to have believed he was talking to a girl and took his life on July 15 when he was told the conversations would be shared with friends and family unless he paid up.

    It is understood he was sent a message which warned that his life would not be worth living unless he deposited money into a named account.

    Police Scotland told the BBC the case was being investigated and urged anyone who feared they were being targeted to contact them.

    The case follows that of 14-year-old Hannah Smith in Leicestershire who took her life after she was allegedly bullied online.

    The operators of website Ask.fm have been criticised for not doing enough to prevent abuse.
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

  8. #233
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Sharjah police has arrested a man who has been posing as a female matchmaker offering to find husbands for women desperate to marry.

    The man, who used the guise of ‘Umm Mansour’ (mother of Mansour) put out adverts via the Blackberry messaging service. When women said they were interested in finding a suitable husband he quickly switched from the motherly matchmaker and played the part of the perfect groom-to-be himself.

    The GCC national, identified by detectives as Joseph MP, would lead the unsuspecting women on before disappearing with their Dhs500 deposits for the matchmaking service. A police spokesman said he would then move on to his next victims.

    ​Sharjah police has arrested a man who has been posing as a female matchmaker offering to find husbands for women desperate to marry\

    Sharjah police has arrested a man who has been posing as a female matchmaker offering to find husbands for women desperate to marry

    Umm Mansour’s true identity was revealed after a bride-to-be got suspicious and went to the police.

    They traced the man through the bank account she paid cash into. The director of criminal investigation urged other victims to come forward.

    He also warned young girls and their parents to be extra-vigilant and to think twice about using a matchmaker advertising online or through social media. He said: “These ads promise finding a perfect husband and girls who want to marry are easy victims of swindling and fraud.

    “Anybody who is a victim or who sees such websites can call us and report them so we can bring these people to justice.”

    Contact 800 151 or 999 or 065 632 222

    Sharjah police has arrested a man who has been posing as a female matchmaker offering to find husbands for women desperate to marry | 7 Days Dubai
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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  9. #234
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Astrology-Based Investment Ponzi Scheme Lands Florida Man in Prison
    by MainStreet.com Aug 15th 2013 12:50PM
    Fortune Teller Looking Into Crystal Ball, Filled With Money. (Photo by Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)Education Images/UIG via Getty Images
    By Hal M. Bundrick

    Divining market movement on moon motion might not work. Gurudeo "Buddy" Persaud of Orlando gave it a go and is now facing three years in federal prison.

    Last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission charged the ex-broker with defrauding investors through an astrology-based Ponzi scheme that bilked clients out of nearly $1 million. In a plea agreement, Persaud was sentenced to prison this week for mail fraud and ordered to pay $948,340.00 in restitution.

    According to the plea agreement and the SEC's complaint, Persaud was working as a registered representative at a Florida-based broker-dealer but separately formed White Elephant Trading Company LLC in 2007. Persaud pitched investors a "safe" and guaranteed return of between 6% and 18% by investing in stocks, futures, real estate markets and notes.

    He apparently failed to mention to clients that his trading strategy was based on lunar cycles and the gravitational pull between the moon and the Earth. According to the SEC, Persaud believed that the gravitational pull between the moon and Earth affects human behavior, which in turn impacts the stock markets. For example, Persaud believed that when the moon is positioned in a manner that exerts a greater gravitational pull on human beings, they feel down and are therefore more inclined to sell securities in the markets.

    The SEC's investigation revealed that from no later than July 2007 until at least January 2011 Persaud raised more than $1 million from investors in Florida, Connecticut and New York, but invested only a portion, instead using the money from later investors to pay earlier investors in a classic Ponzi scheme. He also used nearly $415,000 of the money to support his and his family members' lifestyles. Persaud issued phony statements to conceal the fraud from investors.The celestial trading scheme was apparently unsuccessful. On the investments that Persaud did execute, he lost $400,000 -- with net losses on trades from the very first month he received investor contributions.

    Astrology-Based Investment Ponzi Scheme Lands Florida Man in Prison - DailyFinance

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  10. #235
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    UH this nonsense again. These guys weren't even trading.

    The pyramid scheme, as it was explained to investors, took advantage of temporary price differences between different stock markets using a computer algorithm. By buying and selling quickly, sometimes thousands of times per day, profits were guaranteed to grow through the volume of trades, according to court documents.


    MOBILE, Alabama - Yaman Sencan and Stephen Merry, accused of running an elaborate pyramid scheme scamming nearly $5 million from investors, pleaded not guilty to charges of conspiracy, securities fraud and wire fraud during a federal court arraignment Wednesday.

    Sencan and Merry are two of four men involved in the scam, making false promises and then lying about fictitious profits to investors across the country, including at least three people in Mobile and Baldwin counties, according to a May 2013 indictment.

    Both men were released on probationary conditions pending an October 2013 trial.

    The pyramid scheme, as it was explained to investors, took advantage of temporary price differences between different stock markets using a computer algorithm. By buying and selling quickly, sometimes thousands of times per day, profits were guaranteed to grow through the volume of trades, according to court documents.

    U.S. Magistrate Judge Sonja Bivens read charges against the two men, a lengthy 20-count indictment detailing the ways in which money was taken, used to make “Ponzi” payments to other investors, drained for personal expenses, and then covered up through false account statements and emails.

    Stephen Merry owned one of the companies behind the scheme, Ramco and Associates.

    Federal prosecutors allege Merry lured clients to invest in Ramco, funneling their money into an investment pool called Westover Energy Trading Partners.

    Beginning March 2010, Merry worked with two other defendants, David Petersen of Ramco and Timothy Durkin of Westover, soliciting and investing clients’ funds into the Westover pool.

    Petersen and Durkin were not present in court Wednesday, but face similar fraud and conspiracy charges.

    Yaman Sencan served as the main point of contact between the three other men, according to court documents, finding clients across the country to invest in Ramco and Westover.

    In reality, no trades or transactions ever occurred, according to court documents, and all the supposed profits only existed on paper to appease investors.

    The pyramid came tumbling down when investors began asking to withdraw their funds in January 2012, none of which were ever returned, according to court documents.

    Sencan and Merry both sought publicly-appointed attorneys for the October trial and each testified they are currently unemployed.

    Feds say 4 men misled Mobile and Baldwin investors in multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme | al.com
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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  11. #236
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    WA victims scammed out of $2m in a week

    Gullible West Australians have reported being conned out of more than $2 million in just one week, including an elderly man who lost $1 million in a romance scam.

    Despite repeated warnings, WA's Consumer Protection department said between August 5 and 9, 24 people reported losing money in various scams.

    That included a man in his late 70s from WA's Great Southern region who admitted he handed over $1 million during a complex romance fraud, which started more than three years ago and has left him destitute.

    The fraud was only discovered after the man sent a large sum of cash to Ghana.

    Two others victims said they had lost $180,000 and $91,000 each in separate romance frauds.

    Another victim has reported losing half a million dollars in an investment scam.

    And yet another reported losing $18,000 in a 'help me' scam, after being duped into believing a Croatian relative needed the money to come to Australia for urgent health reasons.

    Anne Driscoll, WA's Commissioner for Consumer Protection, said the financial losses suffered by scam victims were enormous.

    "People who have fallen victim to the clever tactics of professional and well-organised criminals not only suffer huge financial losses, but their confidence, trust and self-esteem are seriously eroded as well," Ms Driscoll said.

    "It's heart-breaking to hear the stories of victims who, in many cases, have lost their life savings and also suffer the emotional and psychological effects of their traumatic experience."

    Late last year, 67-year-old WA woman Jette Jacobs was found dead in a rented villa after travelling to South Africa to visit a Nigerian love interest authorities believe was scamming her.

    And earlier this week, a Nigerian man was arrested in his home country after attempting to sell a Perth property that was not his, using forged documents.
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

  12. #237
    kschang is offline Senior Scambuster
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Quote Originally Posted by ribshaw View Post
    UH this nonsense again. These guys weren't even trading.
    The pyramid scheme, as it was explained to investors, took advantage of temporary price differences between different stock markets using a computer algorithm. By buying and selling quickly, sometimes thousands of times per day, profits were guaranteed to grow through the volume of trades, according to court documents.
    You can't arbitrage different stock markets. It's not the *same stock* any way. The same company can list different stocks on different exchanges, but it's not the same stock. AFAIK, of course.

    Though it sounds cool, it sounds like Forex and... Charles Ponzi. :)
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  13. #238
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Quote Originally Posted by kschang View Post
    You can't arbitrage different stock markets. It's not the *same stock* any way. The same company can list different stocks on different exchanges, but it's not the same stock. AFAIK, of course.
    This is an area I have followed with as much if not more enthusiasm than scams, partly I think because there is so much more information available. Stock could either be the same, or in the form of an ADR in the US. But largely the markets are so efficient that it is getting harder and harder for anyone to have a lock on arbitrage. And certainly the guys running the big high frequency trading operations have much more access and firepower than the "retail" guys ever will. Or if they truly have a viable system they can literally get billions to manage, without having to set foot in a Ramada conference room in Craptown USA.

    You may enjoy some reading on this guy. Edward O. Thorp - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    A lot of what he did was in the infancy of computers. Now even a retail trading platform will have a BEST routing system, so a small trader can see the National Best Bid and Offer on almost any product be it stock or option. And the option pricing models are built in so a small trader can at least get an idea of what an option should theoretically sell for.

    I think Eagle had pointed out in his book that very successful money managers have returned on the order of 20% per YEAR, and that is the world class guys like Buffet, Soros, Cohen, Ichan, etc. So anyone promising much beyond that, especially risk free is either naive, or a flat out con.
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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  14. #239
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    The one in orange claimed she new the checks were fake and was just trying to help out. Not so sure, but cashing bad checks leaves you liable no matter what.

    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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  15. #240
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    This is a great summary of scams that are used by people pretending to be military. Hopefully no one is still falling for the Osama Bin Laden scam, but the Trunk Box Scam is still live and well.

    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    I saw a compliant on another site from a business owner about a shipping/invoice scam maybe later will dig up the business he is complaining about as the story was interesting.

    Billing scams

    Small businesses are often victimized by scam artists and may never even know they have been scammed. Here is one common scam and tips on how to protect your business.
    Phony Billing Schemes

    Kentucky businesses should be on the alert for invoices demanding payment for supplies, goods and services never ordered or never received. Every year, businesses lose substantial amounts of money because they fail to question or even recognize these phony demands for payment.
    Yellow Page Advertising

    The most common type of phony billing scheme involves solicitations for "yellow page" advertising. Consumer complaints filed with the Attorney General's Office, Consumer Protection Division, indicate that a variety of firms send statements for "yellow page" directory advertisements that look very similar to invoices mailed by better-known directories. The solicitations even include the familiar "let your fingers do the walking" symbol. Sometimes businesses are contacted by telephone asking them to renew ads from last year, leaving the impression that the transaction is routine.

    Since the solicitations and invoices appear to be identical to a normal billing, the invoice is often inadvertently paid with other routine bills. These invoices range in price from a few dollars to several hundred dollars. The directory publishers stay within the limitations of law by including a statement that says "this is not a bill and you are under no obligations to pay the amount stated." The directories may be published, but the independent promoters rarely provide details about how many directories are published and where they are distributed.
    Office Supplies

    Kentucky businesses also receive invoices for office supplies that look quite authentic. They are often personalized to include the name of the business or even the purchasing agent. Sometimes these are advertisements cleverly disguised to look like bills. Follow-up letters and invoices are often sent, to give the impression that you are late in making a payment. Some companies follows their solicitation with a letter threatening credit rating damage if the phony invoice is not paid. Other billers may assert that a tape recording has been made of the agreement to purchase goods or services and that collection procedures will begin in order to get the money.
    Protect Your Business

    Take the following precautions to protect your business against phony billing schemes:

    Don't place orders over the telephone unless you are certain it is a reputable firm.
    Be sure of the organization's name, address and phone number as well as the solicitor's name and his or her position with the company. Check records to confirm any claim of past business.
    Read your mail carefully. Warn employees to be on the alert for any unusual invoices.
    Check business records to determine if merchandise or services were authorized, ordered and delivered before paying invoices. It may be helpful to have one employee review and approve all invoices.
    If the company claims to have a tape recording of the order, insist on hearing it.
    Before placing any advertisements, verify that the publication exists. Make sure its circulation meets your needs.
    When in doubt about yellow page directories, contact the directory you want to carry your advertisements to verify that renewal invoices have been mailed and clarify procedures for payment.
    Report phony billings to postal authorities and alert other businesses in your area.

    Office of the Attorney General : Billing scams

    And this is the shipping variety. Scam alert | Glass Magazine

    Shipping scam.JPG
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    UGH!!! What next, if someone motions you in to traffic better be sure, if not just give them the universal 1 finger no thanks and let them pass.

    Motorists warned about 'flash and crash' insurance scam

    Motorists have been warned of a new car accident insurance fraud known as “flash and crash”.
    It involves drivers lying in wait for victims to pull out from shops, car parks or petrol forecourts.

    The fraudsters flash their headlights to let the victim join a main road, but then speed up, hitting the other car side-on, according to APU, an automotive anti-fraud investigation specialist.

    The phenomenon is believed to have emerged as a trend at the beginning of the year.

    Neil Thomas, APU’s director of investigative services and a former detective inspector with West Midlands Police, said: “It is yet another example of how criminal gangs are becoming more sophisticated and attempting to stay one step ahead of suspicion.

    “The adoption of flashing headlights and beckoning the driver results in a 'your word against mine’ situation when it comes to apportioning blame

    Motorists warned about 'flash and crash' insurance scam - Telegraph
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    A virus typically used to steal credit card information has been repurposed to target Instagram, generating fake "likes" and followers, and selling them online. As Reuters reports, these fake "likes" are then sold in batches of 1,000 on online forums, and can fetch surprisingly high prices. According to security firm RSA, 1,000 Instagram followers sell for around $15 online, while 1,000 "likes" selling for $30. The same number of credit card numbers, by comparison, go for as little as $6.

    Experts say this price discrepancy reflects the growing value of social media to businesses or individuals who want to promote their brands or products. Buying fake likes is an easy — if ethically nebulous — way to generate false hype around a brand, and companies are clearly willing to pay comparatively high prices for them.

    ""It's fine for the first 100, but I advise stopping after that.""

    The malware, known as Zeus, first surfaced in 2007 as a botnet network to steal banking and credit card information, and has infected millions of computers. In its modified form, the virus forces infected users to follow or like specific accounts, or to download other viruses. It's not clear how many people have been targeted by the latest version of Zeus, but experts tell Reuters that it's the first malware created explicitly to generate fake "likes" on social media.

    Online marketers say they sometimes advise clients to purchase social media followers to kickstart their campaigns, though relying too heavily on false buzz can soon backfire, making the brand look cheap or spammy. "It's fine to do for the first 100 [followers]," Will Mitchell, an online marketing consultant, told Reuters. "But I always advise stopping after that."

    Instagram virus creates fake 'likes' and followers in lucrative marketing scam | The Verge
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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    Fake Bank Scam Targets Consumers Rebuilding Credit
    BY Philip van Doorn | 08/16/13 - 08:59 PM EDT

    NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- A scam being operated through an imaginary bank is being used to steal money from consumers seeking to rebuild their credit ratings by signing up for secured credit cards.

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency on Friday in a letter directed to all executives of U.S. banks, as well as federal and state regulators warned that "entitled Freedom Gold Club is claiming to be associated with a national bank named Freedom 1st National Bank," which doesn't even exist.

    The OCC is the primary regulator of nationally chartered U.S. banks and savings and loan associations.

    The regulator said "Freedom 1st National Bank is a fictitious entity used as part of a scheme that involves soliciting consumers for semi-secured credit cards through the U.S. mail."

    The fake bank targets consumers through direct mail offers of semi-secured credit cards, with customers required to make deposits of $500 to $900.

    Legitimate secured credit cards do indeed require customers to make deposits, and in return provide actual credit lines, helping customers rebuild credit scores. Customers can eventually withdraw their deposits after their credit scores improve, or they can simply pay their credit balances to zero, close the accounts and get their deposits back.

    But in the case of "Freedom 1st National Bank," consumers have been sending in checks and signing program agreements, only to see their deposits disappear.

    "The checks are cashed by an individual using the name of Bradford C. Ege II, and the victims never receive the anticipated credit card," the OCC said.

    The phony "Freedom 1st National Bank" has also been claiming to be affiliated with a real bank, Credit One Bank, N.A., of Las Vegas, which offers credit cards and is regulated by the OCC. The regulator took pains to make clear that "Credit One Bank, N.A., has no connection" with the "Freedom 1st National Bank" scam.

    The regulator requested that anyone with information on the "fraudulent entity... purportedly located [at] 601 NE 11th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.," contact the OCC via email at occalertresponses@occ.treas.gov.

    What can consumers seeking to rebuild credit do to protect themselves from this type of scam? For one thing, it is fairly easy to confirm whether or not a bank exists. The customer agreements should mention the actual name and address of the chartered depository institution taking the deposits. You can then go to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Web site and search for the institution's call report or thrift financial report, by clicking here.

    Then, for report type, select "Call/TFR." Then type the institution's name to search for it. If no report comes up, and we are in the middle of the quarterly cycle when banks file their financial information with regulators, you may need to go back a quarter when selecting the report date.

    The call report includes the bank's address right at the top.

    The credit card offer should also include a customer service phone number. Call them and speak with a representative, to make sure you know which bank is involved.

    And if they don't provide a customer service phone number, take your business elsewhere.

    Fake Bank Scam Targets Consumers Rebuilding Credit - TheStreet
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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    NEW MARKET, Ala. (WHNT) – Another day, another scam. Thursday afternoon, Joyce Bates was shocked to find an outstanding bill in her mailbox. The debt collector was asking for nearly $1100, due immediately.

    But something didn’t quite seem right about the payment request, so Bates did some investigating.

    “‘This notice has been sent to you by a collection agency the record of Dish Network shows your account balance of $1,083.68,” read Bates.

    The letter was from Convergent Outsourcing, a company claiming to be a collection agency representing Dish Network. But there was a problem.

    “I have never had dish network,” said Bates.

    Bates called Dish Network, they had no record of an outstanding balance. She then called the collection agency, she says they gave her ‘the run around.’ Finally, Bates called the Better Business Bureau.

    According to the BBB convergent outsourcing has had 584 complaints filed against them in just the past 3 years.

    “We’re finding it to be very common and finding that a key element is they’ll say there’s a debt but if you act quickly they’ll negotiate with you,” said Michele Mason, with the Better Business Bureau of North Alabama. “In this case they’re offering to cut it in half if you settle with them.”

    Bates’ notice offered just that, claiming if she paid immediately she would only owe $541.

    When Bates spoke with a representative they even asked for her social security number.

    It’s a scenario Mason has heard time and time again.

    “When she answered ‘why do you need my social security number?’ they said fine we’ll just write it off. Which clearly indicates there is some sort of ploy here,” said Mason.

    Mason says it’s easy to tell if a debt collection agency is legitimate. If you receive a suspicious debt collection call or letter, “don’t get in a panic.” Call the company supposedly owe money to directly to verify if you really owe a debt.

    “If you really owe debt and they are contacting you for the first time, they’ll give you time to verify it,” said Mason.

    You can contact the BBB of North Alabama at 256-850-0719 or the toll-free number 1-866-94-BBB-19.

    Debt Collecting Scam Targets New Market Woman | WHNT.com

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    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Barbara Stephens wrote The Desk this week to warn others about a new twist on Medicare scams. Normally scammers pose as Medicare reps seeking financial or other personal information for billing or medical record issues.

    But Stephens' 82-year-old mother received a call from "Medicare" offering a new service that makes sure she took her medication properly: They would send someone out to the house to check!?!?

    "My mother recognized this to be a scam, told them she knows how to take her medication and hung up,” Stephens wrote.

    Thanks for the heads-up Barbara and tell you mom, “Nice work!”

    This reminds me a bit of another recent scam aimed directly at seniors, who are told in phone calls that a loved one has bought them the device to alert authorities if they need help. The pitch is that the service is free, but ultimately seniors end up paying for a monthly service that isn’t actually related to Life Alert, the company famous for its “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” campaign.

    In other states seniors say they’ve sent off money to the scammers and never received any equipment at all.

    As I looked around, I found a few other interesting sites -- the National Council on Aging and the Los Angeles arm of the BBB -- offering advice for senior citizens about other types of scams aimed directly at them.

    The Desk: Reader warns of new Medicare scam | OregonLive.com

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    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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    UAE journalist falls victim to money-transfer scam
    Sent money to cousin in Cyprus, but it was picked up by swindler
    By

    Staff

    Published Saturday, August 17, 2013

    A UAE-based journalist this week received an urgent email from his cousin in Abu Dhabi saying he was in Cyprus and needed money instantly after his bag was stolen while he was attending an engineering conference.

    The journalist was given an address in the southern Cypriot town of Limassol and asked to remit 1,000 euros to his cousin through a well-known money exchange firm.

    A few minutes after receiving the message, the journalist rushed to the exchange in Abu Dhabi and sent the money. Three hours later, the funds were collected.

    “I later phoned my cousin and asked him to confirm receiving the money, but he was surprised and said he had no idea what I was talking about,” the journalist said.

    “I told him about the email. When he checked his email, he discovered that it was hacked and that the one who asked for money was someone else.

    “My cousin then asked me to rush to the exchange firm and get my money back.”

    The journalist said that when he asked that company to cancel the remittance and give his money back, he was told that it has already been collected in Limassol.

    “I told them that my cousin was not in Cyprus and that his email was hacked by someone, who also had access to the remittance number.

    They said they would investigate the problem, but that this would take a few weeks.”

    After insisting, one employee at that company told the journalist that the money could have been collected by a “swindler with a fake ID.”

    “I then told them that we both were victims of a well-planned scam. I said that I made a mistake by sending the funds before ascertaining my cousin’s message, but that they also made a mistake by handing the money without verifying that ID,” the journalist said.

    “They then asked me to submit a non-payment claim request and promised to investigate the problem. One employee said he was not sure if I could ever retrieve my funds on the grounds it has been collected, but I told him that the money was sent in my cousin’s name and it was not my cousin who really collected the money.

    “Anyway, I am still waiting for their response and hope to recover even part of the money, it has to be a common responsibility as both of us were victims.”

    UAE journalist falls victim to money-transfer scam - Emirates 24/7

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    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    A ZILLION VARIATIONS OF THIS.

    BBB warns of utility bill payment scam


    The Better Business Bureau is warning consumers in North Carolina and South Carolina about a bill payment scam that is targeting utility customers. Scammers claiming to be from Duke Energy have been calling individuals and small businesses in the Southern Piedmont area and telling them that their electric bill is past due. The caller threatens that their electricity will be turned off within hours unless they make an immediate payment by a prepaid debit card, such as the Green Dot Money Card available at WalMart.

    “Today, this scam is targeting Duke Energy customers, but scammers could target Time Warner Cable customers or Piedmont Natural Gas customers tomorrow,” said BBB President Tom Bartholomy. “It is important for utility customers to know what the red flags are so that they don’t become a victim of this scam.”

    This wave of scam calls is the second round since November. The BBB has advice for utility customers:

    • Be suspicious of callers who demand immediate payment for any reason.

    • Never give out personal or financial information to anyone who calls or emails you.

    • Never wire money or provide debit or credit card numbers to someone you do not know.

    • Call the number on your utility company bill to find out if there is a problem with your account.

    “Since November, these criminals have adopted new tactics,” said Tom Cunningham, Duke Energy payments manager. “Some use caller ID spoofing to replicate Duke Energy’s customer service number, or falsely claim to be with a third party collection agency representing Duke Energy. It’s very important that customers recognize the red flags.”

    Duke Energy offers customers a number of payment options, including online, by phone, by automatic bank draft, by mail or in person.

    According to Cunningham, Duke Energy never contacts customers to demand a prepaid debit card payment to avoid an immediate service disconnection. “We urge customers who suspect or experience fraud, or feel threatened during contact with one of these thieves, to hang up and call local police, then Duke Energy to get their current account balance,” added Cunningham.

    Duke Energy contact numbers in N.C. and S.C. include:

    • Duke Energy Carolinas Customers – 800-777-9898

    • Progress Energy Carolinas Customers – 800-452-2777

    BBB warns of utility bill payment scam | Salisbury Post
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    If you get a call from someone claiming to be from the federal government and offering you a new health insurance card, it might be a scam. CORRECTION IT IS A SCAM

    The Wisconsin Better Business says con artists are trying to take advantage of confusion over the new Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Ran Hoth, the agency's president, says the caller generally claims to be from the government and says the recipient has been selected to receive an insurance card. The caller then asks for the recipient's bank account and Social Security numbers for verification.

    Hoth says the government rarely calls individuals. He advises residents who receive such calls to hang up.

    In general, never give our bank account numbers, date of birth, credit card numbers or Social Security numbers.

    Read more: Wis. residents warned about healthcare scam | Modern Healthcare Wis. residents warned about healthcare scam | Modern Healthcare
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    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    LANSING, KS (KCTV) -

    A Lansing woman wants to warn others about a computer scam that is spreading across Kansas.

    Roberta Lough is ashamed to say she got swindled by one of the oldest tricks in the con artist's book.

    It all started with a phone call.

    Within minutes, Lough said conmen had taken over her computer and had access to everything she had.

    She said the same scam artists have contacted other women in both Lansing and Leavenworth.

    "When he started his phone call, he said, 'My name is Steve, badge No. 8025. I'm with the technical support with Microsoft. You're computer has been running very, very slow.' Which mine has," Lough said.

    Lough is cautious, especially when it comes to her computer.

    She told the caller she wasn't interested in his help. Then he mentioned he could fix the very problem she was having with her computer.

    "Finally, he said the word that caught my attention, which is that I had a mediaplex spyware on our computer. I thought he must be from Microsoft to know that," Lough said.

    She logged onto her computer and immediately regretted that decision.

    "All the sudden these black boxes started coming up, and he started going into all these things saying they were viruses. I said, 'Wait, wait, wait. I don't want you doing all of that,'" Lough said.

    Lough panicked as more and more boxes popped up before her eyes.

    She turned off her computer, but it was too late. When she turned it back on, she was locked out of her own computer. She called her technician for help.

    "I told him what I did and he said, 'Berta, you just fell for the biggest scam there is.' I started crying because I am very cautious when it comes to my computer, and I felt stupid because I fell for it. He talked so fast," she said.

    That is why she is sharing her story. She has heard about similar things happening to others and thought how she would never fall for something like that, but she did.

    "When they call you, just hang up. Don't give them time to say anything. If they put spyware on your computer, they know about you already. They know what websites you've been visiting," Lough said.

    A spokesperson for the Better Business Bureau said this is a very common scam that comes and goes in waves.

    The BBB said if you believe you have been scammed, contact your financial institutions and closely monitor all financial records to see if there is any suspicious activity.

    LANSING, KS (KCTV) -

    A Lansing woman wants to warn others about a computer scam that is spreading across Kansas.

    Roberta Lough is ashamed to say she got swindled by one of the oldest tricks in the con artist's book.

    It all started with a phone call.

    Within minutes, Lough said conmen had taken over her computer and had access to everything she had.

    She said the same scam artists have contacted other women in both Lansing and Leavenworth.

    "When he started his phone call, he said, 'My name is Steve, badge No. 8025. I'm with the technical support with Microsoft. You're computer has been running very, very slow.' Which mine has," Lough said.

    Lough is cautious, especially when it comes to her computer.

    She told the caller she wasn't interested in his help. Then he mentioned he could fix the very problem she was having with her computer.

    "Finally, he said the word that caught my attention, which is that I had a mediaplex spyware on our computer. I thought he must be from Microsoft to know that," Lough said.

    She logged onto her computer and immediately regretted that decision.

    "All the sudden these black boxes started coming up, and he started going into all these things saying they were viruses. I said, 'Wait, wait, wait. I don't want you doing all of that,'" Lough said.

    Lough panicked as more and more boxes popped up before her eyes.

    She turned off her computer, but it was too late. When she turned it back on, she was locked out of her own computer. She called her technician for help.

    "I told him what I did and he said, 'Berta, you just fell for the biggest scam there is.' I started crying because I am very cautious when it comes to my computer, and I felt stupid because I fell for it. He talked so fast," she said.

    That is why she is sharing her story. She has heard about similar things happening to others and thought how she would never fall for something like that, but she did.

    "When they call you, just hang up. Don't give them time to say anything. If they put spyware on your computer, they know about you already. They know what websites you've been visiting," Lough said.

    A spokesperson for the Better Business Bureau said this is a very common scam that comes and goes in waves.

    Lansing woman warns about scam targeting computer owners - KCTV5
    "When you get something for nothing, you just haven't been billed for it yet." - Franklin P. Jones
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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