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Thread: Magical Fuel Savers

  1. #1
    GlimDropper's Avatar
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    Magical Fuel Savers

    As soon as word of trouble in Libya even before there was any form of supply disruption, gasoline prices at the pump started to rise. As Gaddafi's forces and freedom fighters square it out in oil producing areas the media is filled with stories about how high prices will go. Have no fear, before I even learned how to drive I've been hearing about any number of products you could buy which would give you 10-15 or even 25% more miles to the gallon. But the strange thing is, none of them ever seemed to work.

    I've seen fuel additives of every description from liquids to pills. I've seen "Water to Fuel" qizmos which split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen to be burned instead of gas. I've even seen special magnets which were supposed to.,.. I forget how the magnets were supposed to work but if you clipped them to your fuel line and watched the savings roll in. The cynic in me always figured that since your wallet would be lighter after purchasing one of these fuel savers your car's engine didn't need to work as hard getting you where you were going and by golly, it seems the Federal Trade Commission doesn't disagree with me.

    The water to gas scams appeal to the do it yourselfers. You buy blueprints or instruction sets telling you where to buy the little plastic tank to hold some water (the only part of this deal that does) and where to buy the electrical components needed to divert energy from your car's electrical system (which was produced by burning fuel) and use it to split the water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen (sometimes called "Brown's gas" in this context). You also need a rubber hose to carry these gasses to the hole you cut in your air intake. The key argument here is that the hydrogen and oxygen, when burned by your car's engine will produce more energy than it took to turn the water into the respective gasses. The people selling the blueprints and instructions (or even complete kits for the more technically timid) all assure you they do. The people without a commercial interest involved are far less optimistic pointing out that the energy required to split a water molecule is greater than the amount of energy given off by burning the resulting gases.

    Don't feel like invalidating your vehicles warranty by modifying it's engine? I don't blame you. Fuel additives of any number of names and descriptions are available to improve efficiency and lighten your wallet. They can be liquid additives like Xtreme Fuel Treatment, convenient little pills like Ferox Fuel Tablets or any of the countless similar products they all have many things in common. They:

    • Increase fuel economy by an impressive percentage.
    • Decrease wear and tear on your sensitive engine parts.
    • And really helps our environment by decreasing pollution.


    Gee, saves money on gas, saves money by increasing engine life AND helps make us a greener world? In an era of shrinking paychecks and rising gas prices who could possibly be against that? No one is, in fact if any of the above claims could be proven the company selling the product would be lauded by the major media all the way from Motor Trend to Mother Jones.,.... but they aren't. Are they?

    Why would a company producing a product making all those claims not be running to respected, independent laboratories begging to get their products tested? Hell go to Car and Driver magazine and let them test it, don't you think they could sell a few copies of their magazine with a top story like "Save 25% on Fuel Costs"? Hell, BP is still smarting over last years oil spill, how many billions would they be willing to pay for a low cost additive which would increase their market share WHILE decreasing automobile pollution? All told any product that could do what these fuel savers claim would be worth billions on the global market, if they could prove it.

    I'm not picking on Ferox International or their Ferox Fuel Tabs but they're a perfect example of the problem, what I say about them is basically true for all the others. Ferox pretends to offer proof, here's their fuel saver proof page. I'll start with their "County Test Procedure" PDF which purports to show the results a county sheriffs department they had using the product. First question, which county? There are more than one in each state and more than one state yet the don't identity which county sheriffs department discovered they could save better than $25,000 a year in fuel costs. Interesting omission don't you think? After all, this is a government agency saving tax dollars, you'd think they're testimony could be a significant selling point but for some reason they're identity isn't revealed. The same is more or less true for the other two "proofs" provided. One is a trucking firm with a name that does exist but who don't seem to have their own website, and no web page I've found mentions that trucking company and Ferox without trying to sell me Ferox. The remaining "proof" is an individual trucker who is even more reclusive than the Sheriffs Department or the other trucking firm. Why are all their "proofs" so difficult to corroborate? Or put another way, if they can't be proven, what do they prove?

    But you have to cut these guys some slack, it isn't like the EPA runs something like a National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory which could prove or disprove their claims once and for all. Oh wait!! They do, I just linked to it. I wonder why Ferox hasn't had their products tested there? Actually I don't and neither do you. If they had it tested and claimed it performed better than the lab results they'd be sued out of existence but as long as Ron the trucker never calls them a liar they can post his "test results" on their website and market their product through a multi level distribution model where they aren't entirely responsible for what their sales force says about their product. Plausible deniability is essential in the snake oil (or fuel) trade.



    Edited to add some useful links from the FTC website I linked to near the top of this post:

    Product Complaints and Refunds

    If you're dissatisfied with a gas-saving product, contact the manufacturer and ask for a refund. Most companies offer money-back guarantees. Contact the company even if the guarantee period has expired. If you're dissatisfied with the company's response, contact your local or state consumer protection agency, the Better Business Bureau or the FTC.
    The FTC works to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop and avoid them. To file a complaint or get free information on consumer issues, visit ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. Watch a video, How to File a Complaint, at ftc.gov/video to learn more. The FTC enters consumer complaints into the Consumer Sentinel Network, a secure online database and investigative tool used by hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.
    Last edited by GlimDropper; 03-09-2011 at 09:10 PM.
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  2. #2
    A Life Aloft is offline fled troglodyte invasion
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    What is amazing to me, is that consumers in desperate times (I mean we are paying $3.93 for unleaded self-serve right now- some places higher and Jet-A $4.83), don't seem to understand, that if any of these fuel additives worked, not only would this be national news but they would be sold in regular retail accounts such as Pep Boys and Kragen and not by some hapless schmuck online. Their supposed bogus inhouse testing claims, are just that....bogus. When you mention the EPA, they come up with lame excuses. Then you always get the "if you haven't tried it how can you know" b.s.

    The FTC has issued this alert:

    Gas-Saving Products: Proceed with Caution
    Gas prices are up, causing many drivers to look for ways to improve fuel efficiency. Although there are practical steps you can take to increase gas mileage, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) suggests that you proceed with caution when you consider buying automotive devices or oil and gas additives based on gas-saving claims. The FTC says that even for the few products that have been found to work, the savings to consumers have been small.

    According to the FTC, it's wise for drivers to be skeptical of the following kinds of advertising claims:

    "This gas-saving product improves fuel economy by 20 percent."
    Claims usually tout savings ranging from 12 to 25 percent. However, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has evaluated or tested more than 100 alleged gas-saving devices and has not found any product that significantly improves gas mileage. In fact, some such products may damage a car's engine or cause substantial increases in exhaust emissions.

    The products on the market that claim to save gas fall into clearly defined categories. Although the EPA has not tested or evaluated every product, it has tried to examine at least one product in each category. Check http://www.epa.gov/otaq/consumer/devicefs.pdf for category descriptions and product names of devices tested by the EPA.

    "After installing your product on my car, I got an extra 4 miles [6.4 kilometers] per gallon [3.8 liters]."
    Many ads feature glowing testimonials by satisfied customers. Yet, few consumers have the ability or the equipment to test for precise changes in gas mileage after installing a device or using a product that claims to save gas. Among the many variables that affect fuel consumption are traffic, road and weather conditions, and the car's condition.

    Take the example of the consumer who sent a letter to a company praising its purported gas-saving product. At the time the product was installed, the consumer had received a complete engine tune-up - a fact not mentioned in the letter. The entire increase in gas mileage attributed to the product may well have been the result of the tune-up alone. But other consumers couldn't have known that from the ad.

    "This gas-saving device is approved by the federal government."
    No government agency endorses gas-saving products for cars. The most that can be claimed in advertising is that the EPA has reached certain conclusions about possible gas savings by testing the product or by evaluating the manufacturer's own test data. If the seller claims that its product has been evaluated by the EPA, ask for a copy of the EPA report, or check US Environmental Protection Agency for information. In some instances, false claims of EPA testing or approval have been made.

    Product Complaints and Refunds
    If you're dissatisfied with a gas-saving product, contact the manufacturer and ask for a refund. Most companies offer money-back guarantees. Contact the company even if the guarantee period has expired. If you're dissatisfied with the company's response, contact your local or state consumer protection agency, the Better Business Bureau or the FTC.

    The FTC works to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop and avoid them. To file a complaint or get free information on consumer issues, visit ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. Watch a video, How to File a Complaint, at ftc.gov/video to learn more. The FTC enters consumer complaints into the Consumer Sentinel Network, a secure online database and investigative tool used by hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.

  3. #3
    A Life Aloft is offline fled troglodyte invasion
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    From MSNBC:

    Over the years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has tested myriad gas-saving devices that burst onto the consumer scene: devices that bleed air into the carburetor or bubble air through a container of water and antifreeze mixture, fuel-line gadgets that heat the gas before it enters the carburetor, magnets that clamp to the inside or outside of the fuel line to change the gasoline's molecular structure and metallic fuel-line additives with dissimilar metals that claim to ionize the fuel.

    Experts say they all have one thing in common. "They don't work," says John Millett, spokesman for the EPA. "Believe me, if it were that easy, cars would be built that way, especially the magnets and whirligig devices. It's smart to be skeptical about any claims like that."

    The EPA to date has tested in the neighborhood of 125 gas-saving devices, the most recent at the request of the Federal Trade Commission, and only six "indicated a very small improvement in fuel economy without an increase in exhaust emissions."

    Another four also made the itty-bitty improvement cut, but per federal regulations, the exhaust emission trade-offs mean consumers who slap these on their cars could face charges of illegal tampering.

    Gopal Duleep, managing director of Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc., a technical consulting firm in Washington, D.C., estimates that 95% of the aftermarket products don't really change fuel economy.

    Popular Mechanics magazine's experts tested seven fuel-saving products for several years now, and found no significant change in miles-per-gallon ratings. Two actually increased fuel consumption by 20%, according to the writer, and a third one melted before they could complete the test.

    But none of this evidence stops an eager entrepreneur from pitching his product to people tired of watching the gas pump numbers spin.

    "Over the last 15 years or so, I've seen the same products come and go under different names," says Roy Cox, manager of technical training and research for AAA Automotive and author of "Improving Fuel Economy: Money in Your Pocket."

    Improbable claims
    Among the popular advertising claims the FTC is warning folks away from:

    "After installing your product on my car, I got an extra 4 miles per gallon." The trouble is, consumers aren't in a position to scientifically test their mileage for results. The testimonial may be heartfelt, but the driver didn't take into consideration traffic and road conditions, weather and his recent tune-up.

    "This gas-saving device is approved by the federal government." According to the FTC, no government agency endorses gas-saving products for cars. The closest they can come to truth in advertising is to say that the EPA has reached certain conclusions about possible gas savings by testing the product or evaluating the manufacturer's own test data.

    Still, innovative breakthroughs happen every day in every field. Who says the gadget on the Internet isn't that phenomenon?

    "These vendors will probably tell you there is some sort of conspiracy among the automotive manufacturers, but nothing could be further from the truth," Cox says. "They (manufacturers) do huge amounts of testing and put a lot of resources into research. It's not something they take lightly."

    Consider the 1981 air-bleed device that the EPA discovered really did affect fuel economy positively. It shut the air conditioner off during short periods of acceleration because the engine was already working hard. Today, new cars don't need the product, because Ford, General Motors and the gang incorporated that winning technology into their designs.

    But the chances of lightning striking twice like that, particularly with piston engines, don't impress Duleep.

    "It's a very small chance, largely because the piston engine has been around for more than 100 years. During this time, every particular angle has been explored, and the chance of somebody overlooking something fairly obvious is pretty small," he says.

    For the auto-mechanically minded, it's common knowledge that inefficiencies in the engine and transmission account for much of a car's energy loss, so those are the areas where Duleep searches for improved fuel economy.

    He likes GM's Displacement-on-Demand engine that uses eight cylinders when you need peak power on an interstate entrance ramp, for example, but cuts down to four cylinders during normal driving conditions. (DaimlerChrysler calls its version the Multiple Displacement System.)

    "Those are the kinds of things that help you reduce the 20% to 37% gap between maximum efficiency and the typical efficiency in a car's energy use," Duleep says.

    Cox, too, points to gas-guzzling problems in his booklet: If carbon buildup or running a few degrees too warm causes the engine to knock, the power-train control module is programmed to retard the ignition timing to correct the problem. However, this retarded timing reduces the engine's power and, thus, burns more fuel. Conditions like combustion chambers that are too hot; worn piston rings, valves and gaskets; or inadequate electrical power from the battery can also suck up to eight miles per gallon off your bottom line.

    Beware the fuel-tank additives
    But notice none of these area's experts cited has anything to do with fuel-tank additives. Most of these magic pills or sticks you drop into the gas tank claim to enhance performance by removing deposits.

    "Only in very limited circumstances would that really help, because gasoline has detergents in it that take care of deposit buildup anyway," says Millett.

    Those limited circumstances involve an older vehicle, one with a carburetor rather than a fuel-injected system, that is driven infrequently or in an atypical way.

    "But for the vast majority of drivers, they don't offer a benefit that EPA has been able to say," he says.

    Gizmos that fall into the "vortex generators" category in essence create mini tornadoes out of the inlet air between the air cleaner and intake manifold.

    According to Popular Science, the idea is to mix fuel with air more thoroughly so that it burns more completely in the combustion chamber. Yet the turbulence reduces the amount of air sucked into the manifold, putting less power at your fingertips. That's how one of the brands Popular Science tested wound up costing a driver 20% more of his precious gasoline stash.

    Cox has found another flaw with the bulk of air-injection products: They fail to combine air and fuel in the first place. "We don't inject the fuel until it gets right down next to the intake of the actual cylinders in the engine. So there are usually at least a couple of inches between the air intake and the fuel," he says.

    Some car enthusiasts do pay racing shops to change their high-end sports car's computer chips to recalibrate the engine and transmission, Duleep says, but such tinkering costs in the neighborhood of $10,000.

    "You can see some modest fuel-economy improvements from those interventions, but it's usually done for performance or to add extra cachet to your car," he says.

    Gas prices alone wouldn't justify that mechanic's bill.

    Finally, the idea of applying magnets to the fuel line has captured many a car owner's imagination. The EPA's October 2005 reports, however, throw a wrench into that pipe dream. The product's advertised 27% fuel-economy improvement didn't materialize in the lab.

    "The oil companies and automobile manufacturers are all saying the same thing, 'We wish it was that easy -- a pill in the tank or a magnet to paste into the fuel line -- because we would really like to get 20% better fuel economy ratings,'" says Cox. "We'd be all over it.'"

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    WishfulThinking is offline Foundling Member
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Glad you raised the topic of the scam fuel saving pills Glim.

    A few years back, fuel pill MLMs were all the rage and were as popular as the food scam MLMs are today. Not one ever received the backing of any part of the motor industry or any reputable professional qualified engineering or scientific organization or association.

    With the increasing prices of fuel, they will doubtless come back on the internet in force.

    People need to use some common sense. There is an enormous motor industry and if and when a product is developed that will save fuel, they will either distribute it themselves or incorporate the necessary technology into their own products AS THEY HAVE ALWAYS DONE BEFORE. It will not be necessary to market a real effective product through MLMs.

    At present the only way to save fuel is to maintain your car properly, use clean filters and proper lubrication. Thoughtful and careful driving and the proper use of gears can also help. (It has been noted that when people have used fuel pills, they also take better care of their cars and driving at the same time, which could account for any drop in gas usuage they have noticed)

    Thanks for the post Glim. Fuel pills in 2011 are a scam. They dont work and only serve to take your money and even damage your car.

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    laidback's Avatar
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    LOL. This topic reminds me of the early '90s. An acquaintance that my wife worked with tried to get her to invest in this marvelous company that had a magical fuel additive that would increase mileage, yada,yada,yada. He even gave her a bottle to try out. He wasn't too pleased when we got the analysis back from her brother,( a chemist) that identified the ingredients.
    I have to admit that the hydrogen generators interested me briefly, but only because I had used a device called a "water welder". I just couldn't buy into the claims being made, though.

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    baylee is offline Senior Scambuster
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    MythBusters did a TV show on fuel additives and the claims. The additives did not fair well.

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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Too bad ole clem is tied up conducting experiments to disprove the mighty Amega wand and sending meaningless troll diatribes to newspapers or he could invest his time and superior IQ into debunking this a calling it out being the self appointed god of mlm that he thinks he is.

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    A Life Aloft is offline fled troglodyte invasion
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Quote Originally Posted by baylee View Post
    MythBusters did a TV show on fuel additives and the claims. The additives did not fair well.
    I am so glad you mentioned that show. I try to catch as many episodes as I can but miss some. I didn't get to see that one, but I found them on you tube. It's pretty entertaining:





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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    I have been searching through here but unable to find the info. It seems I remember reading something about a Dr. somebody who was in charge of UBIEE and one of the things they push is the Power Pill. At one time when I joined Jerky Direct, it linked to this program and I was automatically enrolled under someone else. I never did anything with it and never understood it and eventually dropped out. All they did was send email, I never invested any money with them but did promote it for a short period of time. I see they are still up and running with some friends of mine promoting it in their links. After reading most of what you guys have posted here, I would certainly call it a scam. Is there any further proof that the entire UBIEE thing is a scam? Forgive my lack of knowledge here but I have done some research and came up with nothing substantial, they do have a Facebook account.

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    littleroundman is offline Administrator
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Here ya go, honestme, go HERE to "aussiekeiths" UBIEE portal page and have a read.

    If you make it right down to the bottom of the page without falling off your chair laughing, check out the bottom line on the page where "aussiekeith" says:

    For my Surf and Earn Programs, Please Click Here.

    Anyone who doesn't come away from reading that page with the word "SCAM" running through their mind is in real trouble.

    FYI, I've just spent 10 minutes I'll never get back tracking down as many links from your post above as I could stand and I came across as motley a collection of frauds, fraudsters and nutjobs as you're ever likely to find.

    I have more respect for RealScams mission than to post them all here.

    Trust me, you don't wanna know.

    Last edited by littleroundman; 03-11-2011 at 10:50 AM.
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

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    WishfulThinking is offline Foundling Member
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Quote Originally Posted by honestme11 View Post
    I have been searching through here but unable to find the info. It seems I remember reading something about a Dr. somebody who was in charge of UBIEE and one of the things they push is the Power Pill. At one time when I joined Jerky Direct, it linked to this program and I was automatically enrolled under someone else. I never did anything with it and never understood it and eventually dropped out. All they did was send email, I never invested any money with them but did promote it for a short period of time. I see they are still up and running with some friends of mine promoting it in their links. After reading most of what you guys have posted here, I would certainly call it a scam. Is there any further proof that the entire UBIEE thing is a scam? Forgive my lack of knowledge here but I have done some research and came up with nothing substantial, they do have a Facebook account.
    HonestMe11 they've been called out many times on your community, and the warnings have included UBIEE which is owned by Dr. Michael Dolgorusky ex of the failed Ubifone MLM. (In Ubifone he shared leadership with Santiago Fuentes who later moved on to "greater things" with Carmona of the Finanzas Forex / Evolution Marketing group .

    KABOOM! Agents Tie Alleged ‘Evolution Market Group’ Ponzi And HYIP Fraud Scheme To Narcotics Case In Arizona; Tens Of Millions Of Dollars Seized; Firms Promoted On ASA Monitor, TalkGold Forums

    You will see he kept good company. lol.)

    Warning Letter to Internet Marketers on Fuel Saving Products From The FTC | View Thread | AdlandPro Community

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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Hello HonestMe.

    Clicked on the link and found an old post I made back in 2008 on the thread in Adland on Fuel Pills and the FTC warnings. lol Nothing has changed. there is still no verified testing to give any evidence that these products can do anything other than put money in the pockets of those at the top of the MLM pyramid.

    There were a couple more threads full of verified technical data which no longer seem to be online at AdlandPro in which there was a terrible row between the writer of the thread, Ken Sword who used to give anti scam advice there, and the same Dr. Michael mentioned above. There was also another thread from the TGAMM radio people on similar lines, also contested bitterly by the same Doctor, with accompanying abusive posts from his supporters. If I recall, the said "doctor" demanded the instant removal of the perpetrators of the dreadful truth about fuel additives and, again, if I recall, it was one of the rare occasions when the owner removed the scammer and not the messengers.

    The scam is still around, parading as an "eco friendly"/charitable effort. The concept of cash gifiting comes to mind as well here.

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    WishfulThinking is offline Foundling Member
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    LRM

    Clicked on your link "here" and got the most extraordinary link to a dot org site about a peace festival requesting paypal donations!

    UNITY FOUNDATION - WELCOME !

    Are they watching this forum and changing their links or did you post the wrong hyperlink?

    there is no "For my Surf and Earn Programs, Please Click Here." option, which enquiring minds would like to see.

    Please provide, or did i miss something?

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    littleroundman is offline Administrator
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Hmmn, you're correct, Wishful,

    how strange, I wonder what happened.

    Let's try again:

    U B I E E PORTAL Page with Keith Rankin
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

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    WishfulThinking is offline Foundling Member
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Hi LRM. Just checked out the new link. The expression "amateurs night out" sprang to mind, and that was before clicking on any of the links. LOL

    So it seemed to be a good idea to check out the company's own web page and it was even worse.

    When will people understand that real businesses do not operate like this?

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    littleroundman is offline Administrator
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Believe me, it gets worse.

    Looking up the registrants behind the IP addresses, hostnames and domains of the websites connected to UBIEE leads to a list of fundamentalists, sovereign citizens and well known fraudsters.
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Quote Originally Posted by littleroundman View Post
    Here ya go, honestme, go HERE to "aussiekeiths" UBIEE portal page and have a read.

    If you make it right down to the bottom of the page without falling off your chair laughing, check out the bottom line on the page where "aussiekeith" says:

    For my Surf and Earn Programs, Please Click Here.

    Anyone who doesn't come away from reading that page with the word "SCAM" running through their mind is in real trouble.

    FYI, I've just spent 10 minutes I'll never get back tracking down as many links from your post above as I could stand and I came across as motley a collection of frauds, fraudsters and nutjobs as you're ever likely to find.

    I have more respect for RealScams mission than to post them all here.

    Trust me, you don't wanna know.

    Thank you LRM but I am sorry to have wasted a full ten minutes of your life. LOL Sometimes the best way to find out is to just ask. I will certainly check on your links because I have a close friend that is advertising it and would not if they had a clue about this.
    Last edited by scratchycat; 03-12-2011 at 11:48 AM.

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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Quote Originally Posted by littleroundman View Post
    Hmmn, you're correct, Wishful,

    how strange, I wonder what happened.

    Let's try again:

    U B I E E PORTAL Page with Keith Rankin
    I just did the same thing and wondered what the heck is this??? LOL

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    littleroundman is offline Administrator
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Quote Originally Posted by honestme11 View Post
    Thank you LRM but I am sorry to have wasted a full ten minutes of your life. LOL Sometimes the best way to find out is to just ask. I will certainly check on your links because I have a close friend that is advertising it and would not if they had a clue about this.
    The ten minutes wasn't wasted on answering your question.

    After all, that's why I'm a member of the forum.

    The 10 minutes was wasted because of the standard of the people behind the information I found.

    They're not even clever or original in what they're attempting to do.

    What an amateur bunch of low life crooks and nutjobs.
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Quote Originally Posted by alasycia View Post
    Hello HonestMe.

    Clicked on the link and found an old post I made back in 2008 on the thread in Adland on Fuel Pills and the FTC warnings. lol Nothing has changed. there is still no verified testing to give any evidence that these products can do anything other than put money in the pockets of those at the top of the MLM pyramid.

    There were a couple more threads full of verified technical data which no longer seem to be online at AdlandPro in which there was a terrible row between the writer of the thread, Ken Sword who used to give anti scam advice there, and the same Dr. Michael mentioned above. There was also another thread from the TGAMM radio people on similar lines, also contested bitterly by the same Doctor, with accompanying abusive posts from his supporters. If I recall, the said "doctor" demanded the instant removal of the perpetrators of the dreadful truth about fuel additives and, again, if I recall, it was one of the rare occasions when the owner removed the scammer and not the messengers.

    The scam is still around, parading as an "eco friendly"/charitable effort. The concept of cash gifiting comes to mind as well here.
    That was not so long ago either. I never saw it that I remember. Sharon got me into that thing and got upset when I got out. It looked to be a real hoax and apparently it is. I have just warned my friend.

  21. #21
    A Life Aloft is offline fled troglodyte invasion
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    This is very simple. If there is no EPA testing, then it's a scam. Period.

    TWO STEP EPA TESTING IS REQUIRED BY THE FTC TO MAKE GASOLINE MILEAGE CLAIMS:

    A. The EPA has a list of over 40 testing stations to perform preliminary testing to get into the big time Test. They are located all over the U.S. They cost about $20,000 to run the preliminary test.

    B. If a gasoline additive passes one of the tests above it can go to the EPA testing laboratory itself in Ann Arbor Michigan. The cost = $27,000. The results of this test can be used in any advertising.

    C. Your question should be with these companies rolling in $ millions, why can’t they spare a lousy $47,000 to make sure that their company doesn’t get shut down and to prove and verify that the product actually works?

    THE AG in Texas shut one of these scams down back in 2007. (BioPerformance):

    https://www.oag.state.tx.us/oagnews/release.php?id=1906

    Ask any MLM Company selling a gas additive, just ask one question. Can you see their EPA Certified Emission and Mileage Testing Station Test?

    Not a lab test, that is for flash and safety points for the Material Safety Data Sheet (required to be able to ship and sell it). Not the EPA fuel additive registration, this does not test the product. Registration involves providing a chemical description of the additive. Period. In certain cases health-effects testing is required. There are over 5,600 registered additives. Registration does not involve verification of performance claims made for an additive. No video testimonies, no written sworn statement testimonies, no patents, no private lab tests, no inhouse testing, nothing will withstand the force coming from the FTC and AG’s except the EPA Certified Emission and Mileage test.

  22. #22
    Lil Ol' Radical Me's Avatar
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Having been involved in the ridulous debate that took place on AdlandPro on the subject of fuel pills and UBIEE in particular, and recalling that NO professional scientific or motor industry endorsements were to be found anywhere, I thought it would be fun to see where the headquarters of this super professional business were

    Here they are....


    and they are even marked in GoogleEarth with the company name. (Se Aquila means To Rent - but that may be next door. ) It's obviously in the Business District of town. lol

  23. #23
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    scratchycat is offline Elite Scambuster
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Try convincing people who are in the program. They believe it is helping by promoting their other websites. Oh well, I tried. Thanks for all the comments here.

  24. #24
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Quote Originally Posted by alasycia View Post
    Having been involved in the ridulous debate that took place on AdlandPro on the subject of fuel pills and UBIEE in particular, and recalling that NO professional scientific or motor industry endorsements were to be found anywhere, I thought it would be fun to see where the headquarters of this super professional business were

    Here they are....


    and they are even marked in GoogleEarth with the company name. (Se Aquila means To Rent - but that may be next door. ) It's obviously in the Business District of town. lol
    Well, I ran into a deadend with convincing my friend. Need backup in Adland or FB probably.

    I don't think I would trust something coming from that building!! I posted the link here but will they even look? NO!

  25. #25
    WishfulThinking is offline Foundling Member
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    Re: Magical Fuel Savers

    Educating people about scams is sometimes a thankless task but, nevertheless, is one well worth giving time to do. It is what most of the people here are doing because they are sick and tired of seeing the proliferation of scams that are advertised and blogged all over the internet and the damage they do to individuals and to the economy.

    If enough evidence is posted, sooner or later someone will go and look to see what the nasty naysayers are saying about them and they are always welcome to put their case here on this forum, if they consider that what is being said is untrue. Their posts will not be deleted, but they will have to defend their arguments with more than "they are nice guys". lol

    We are hoping not see a revival of the fuel scams that flooded the internet a few years ago, but if we do, they will surely be owned and promoted by the usual cast of characters who will, once again, make their money and run.

    Common sense alone should tell you that a product that has no endorsement of any kind from the motor industry in any country of the world and is sold by MLM is NOT something you should put in your own car and certainly not sell to anyone else.

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