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Thread: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

  1. #76
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Quote Originally Posted by scratchycat View Post
    Could this be the real one behind that profile??!!

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=1&theater
    LOL Scratchy.
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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  3. #77
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    The ole fake beef jerky scam.

    Kickstarter has finally been discovered by fraudsters. The popular crowd-funding platform for artists and inventors allows anyone with an idea to seek funding from the public, which means scammers are sneaking in to exploit donors with fake products.

    Recently, a California-based company called Magnus Fun began a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for a fake Kobe beef jerky product. With almost 3300 backers and $120,000 in donations, the scammers were poised to walk away with a ton of money until Kickstarter officials shut them down.

    How did this fake beef jerky scam even get off the ground to begin with? Let’s take a look at this bizarre case of online fraud.


    Kickstarter Pulls the Plug on Scam Just in the Nick of Time

    After racking up around 3,300 backers in just a month, the Kickstarter campaign that advertised “Kobe Red 100% Japanese Beer Fed Kobe Beer Jerky” was doing exceptionally well.

    In addition to its solid number of backers, the campaign page featured testimonials from real-life people who supposedly just couldn’t get enough of that delicious Kobe Red beef jerky.

    Except the delicious Kobe Red beef jerky never existed. The company didn’t have photos of their product, public samples or any other evidence to prove their product was real.
    A color photo of a kobe beef steak

    Kobe beef is imported from Japan and is quite a delicacy when it comes to fine beef.

    Due to their huge site membership, the people who run Kickstarter rely on the community to police campaigns and report abuse. It’s good, then, that this got noticed when it did, as it was literally just a few days away from ending.

    Once a successful campaign closes, the campaigners receive all the money no questions asked. That means the scammers almost got away with it.

    The Los Angeles-based Magnus Fun company had its campaign up for a month… but hadn’t posted any information about the company or the people that work for it. (Kickstarter recommends that users do this so that the community feels relatively safe sending money.)


    The “Kickstarted” Documentary Crew Saves the Day

    Had it not been for the work of some dedicated Kickstarter users and the crew behind a documentary called Kickstarted, it’s likely that Magnus Fun would have gotten away with their diabolically beefy scheme.

    The team working on the documentary noticed that something didn’t smell right about the Kobe beef jerky Kickstarter campaign and decided to take a closer look.

    Oddly enough, all the reviews of Magnus Fun’s product were screenshots of text messages. Another strange detail was the fact that the only positive comments on the campaign came from users with brand new accounts that had only backed projects which had failed in the past.

    CNN Money highlighted some even stranger details, courtesy of the Kickstarted crew:

    “In a long post on their own site about their role in exposing the Kobe Red scam, the ‘Kickstarted’ team says they reached out to Magnus Fun with an interview request for the film, and Magnus Fun went back and forth a bit before promising instead to send footage from a recent taste test in California.”

    It definitely seems odd, and Kickstarter thought so too. When the website was made aware of the suspicious details surround the Kobe Red beef jerky campaign, they promptly pulled the plug.

    Magnus Fun has since deleted their Kickstarter account.


    Kickstarter Has Its Risks
    A color photo of some raw kobe beef.

    Authentic Kobe beef is actually very tough to find in the United States.

    What does all this mean for you? Well, first and foremost that it’s important to keep in mind the inherent risks associated with a site like Kickstarter.

    A recent study actually showed that 84% of projects funded by Kickstarter don’t get sent out on time. This means that backers don’t get their promised perks when they expect.

    Additionally, avoiding fraud on a crowd-funding site like Kickstarter is a bit more difficult than traditional sites. Users have to trust that the creators behind a project are honest about their campaign.

    It’s important to use your best discretion and make sure you trust your gut. If something seems suspicious, it probably is.
    - See more at: Scambook Blog
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  4. #78
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Stealing from fellow soldiers, disgusting.
    classy.JPG

    U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class James Robert Jones, an assistant inspector general at Fort Campbell, Ky., is accused of stealing the identities of Army officers, some of whom were in Afghanistan and one of whom was killed there, to get fraudulent bank loans.

    Meet James Robert Jones, sergeant no class.

    The U.S. Army base inspector who investigated misconduct stole the identities of other officers — including a soldier killed in combat — in a scheme to obtain phony bank loans, his indictment says.
    Fort Campbell, Ky., is where U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class James Robert Jones allegedly stole the identities of soldiers in order to apply for loans, authorities contend.


    Jones, whose rank is sergeant first class, was charged Wednesday with using his position as an assistant inspector general at Fort Campbell, Ky., to acquire the personal information of active-duty Army officers, including some soldiers deployed in Afghanistan.

    The 42-year-old from Tennessee applied for loans under the officers’ names, the federal indictment said.
    Federal prosecutor David Rivera says Sgt. 1st Class James Robert Jones stole the identities of Army officers, some of whom were in Afghanistan and one of whom was killed there, to fraudulently obtain bank loans.
    wsmv.com
    Federal prosecutor David Rivera says Sgt. 1st Class James Robert Jones stole the identities of Army officers, some of whom were in Afghanistan and one of whom was killed there, to fraudulently obtain bank loans.

    Jones said he’d plead not guilty.

    “There’s a lot more to the story than what meets the eye,” the accused bottom feeder told The Associated Press in a phone interview Wednesday night.
    Soldiers wait to board a plane to Afghanistan during a deployment at the Fort Campbell, Ky. While they put themselves in harm's way, Sgt. 1st Class James Robert Jones allegedly stole some of their identities to get phony bank loans, according to prosecutors.
    Josh Anderson/AP
    Soldiers wait to board a plane to Afghanistan during a deployment at the Fort Campbell, Ky. While they put themselves in harm's way, Sgt. 1st Class James Robert Jones allegedly stole some of their identities to get phony bank loans, according to prosecutors.

    The alleged scam took place from February to May.

    “This defendant abused a position of trust and used his position to specifically target those who serve our country,” federal prosecutor David Rivera said.
    A U.S. Army soldier killed in combat was allegedly victimized by a base inspector who, ironically, was supposed to probe misconduct. James Robert Jones purportedly swiped the identities of the dead soldier and others in order to fraudulently acquire bank loans, according to prosecutors.
    Rogelio V. Solis/AP
    A U.S. Army soldier killed in combat was allegedly victimized by a base inspector who, ironically, was supposed to probe misconduct. James Robert Jones purportedly swiped the identities of the dead soldier and others in order to fraudulently acquire bank loans, according to prosecutors.

    With News Wire Services

    Read more: US Army sergeant used dead GI
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  5. #79
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    SCAMMER rebecca.violet@yahoo.com

    Meet the Fake Lottery Commission.

    Prize.JPG
    LotteryScam.JPG

    Who also lend themselves out as stock photos when their images are not being used by scammers.

    Not the lottery commission.JPG
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  6. #80
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    By Clark Howard Protect yourself if you use a debit card | www.clarkhoward.com

    ClarkHoward.com


    Debit card account fraud is on the rise. I want to tell you the best way I know to protect yourself.

    Years ago, the bulk of financial fraud involved credit cards alone. But now some 40% of the fraud involves debit cards, while the remaining 60% is with credit cards.

    If your credit card is compromised, the harm to you is relatively small. You contact the issuer to report false charges and you may have to do some paperwork, but no money leaves your hands.

    With debit card fraud, however, there is money that leaves your hands. And you have to fight to get your own money back. Unfortunately, it's now taking longer and longer to get that money back.

    Under the law, banks have 10 business days to give you your money back in the event of debit card fraud. Visa and MasterCard, however, have set their own standard of 5 business days if a compromised debit card has either logo on it, as most do. Yet I'm hearing from callers that the true wait time to get your money back is substantially longer than either 5 or 10 business days.

    Now, I know debit cards are popular because people got in over their heads spending money they didn't have on credit cards. Debit cards, in theory, allow you to spend only what you have.

    But the problem comes if a crook cracks your debit card. Then you have no money to pay your mortgage, your car loan or to buy gas or food, among other things. Your checks start bouncing and, depending on your bank or credit union, the institution may not cover the bounced check charges that result from debit card fraud.

    You now have a 1 in 65 chance of having your debit card compromised. A new study from Symantec says retail is the No. 1 place where you account can be compromised, when crooks hack into databases that contain the numbers from debit card transactions.

    If you are someone who would be financially devastated if your bank account were emptied, I suggest you open a second account and tie your debit card to it. Then fund the second account only with money that's used for debit card activity, so your principal account won't be at risk in the event of a breach.

    That's the best way I know to protect yourself.
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  7. #81
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    The FBI does not send warnings VIA email. Latest Scam eMails: Another FBI based scam! - FW: F.B.I- FINAL REMINDER NOTICE,,



    FBISCAMemail.JPG

    ANTI-TERRORIST AND MONETARY CRIMES DIVISION
    FBI HEADQUARTERS WASHINGTON DC
    FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIONS J.EDGAR HOOVER BUILDING
    935 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, NW WASHINGTON, D.C. 20535-0001
    Ref: FBI/DC/25/113/13/2013
    FBI — Director

    Your attention is needed immediately

    We have been informed through our global intelligence monitoring network that the sum of $10.500, 000.00, has been released from a bank in Africa bearing your name as the beneficiary without dist certificate to clear your name and fund from every terrorist or drug or money laundering activities

    We sincerely apologize for sending you this sensitive information via e-mail instead of a certified mail, phone call or a face-to-face conversation,We will also send you a certified email later it is due to the urgency and importance of the security information needed. To checkmate financial recklessness, illegal gambling, racketeering and considering the effect of the global financial crisis rocking the United States, our government with the help of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (F.B.I) Washington, DC and the internet crime complaint center (ic3),alongside the CIA signed an agreement with U.K police for an immediate release of all overdue funds presently logged in their treasury and to ensure it is disbursed to the rightful beneficiaries in all parts of the world. If you the beneficiary would adhere to our instruction it will help you receive your payment immediately

    The bank knowing fully well that they do not have enough facilities to make this payment from any part of the world to your account directly, used what we know as a secret diplomatic transit payment (s.d.t.p) method to make the payment. direct transfers are difficult and secret diplomatic transit payment (s.d.t.p) are not usually made unless the funds are related to terrorist activities and we ask why must your payment be made in a secret transfer if your transaction is legitimate.

    We do not want you to get into trouble as soon as these funds reflect in your personal account, so it is our duty as an international agency to correct these little problems before this fund reflects into your personal account.

    we advise you to contact us immediately, as your funds have been stopped and are being held in our custody, until you are able to provide us with the dist certificate within 3 days from the country that authorized the transfer to certify that the funds that you are about to receive are terrorist/drug free or we shall have cause to impound the payment and subsequently prosecute you for cross border terrorist financial activites.

    based on our findings, our investigative department wish to warn you against some miscreants, hoodlums and touts who go about scamming innocent people by claiming to be who they are not and thereby tarnishing the image of this wonderful country. By sending out fraudulent emails without our official logo and emblem we shall release your funds immediately we receive this legal document and we will ensure that you receive your payment without any further delay.

    Note

    We decided to contact you directly by email to acquire the proper verifications and proof from you to show that you are the rightful person to receive this fund, because of the huge amount involved. Be informed that the funds are now with a top bank in the united state in your name and under the monitoring/custody of the FBI. At the moment, we have asked the bank not to release the fund to anybody that comes to them, unless we instruct them to do so, and only if we receive the dist certificate this is to enable us carry out a comprehensive investigation first before releasing the fund to you.

    hence, you are to forward your dist certificate to us immediately if you have it in your possession, if you do not have it, then let us know so that we will direct you to the appropriate authority to obtain the certificate then you are to send it to our office. And thereafter, we will instruct the bank holding the funds, to go ahead and credit your account immediately. If you fail to provide the documents to this office, we will prosecute you and take appropriate action against you for not proving the legality of the funds.

    Finally if you truly want to receive this funds without F.B.I troubles then reconfirm the following below

    Name………………………………………………….
    Address………………………………………………..
    Sex………………………………………………………
    Age............................................... ......................
    Contact number………………………………………..
    Country of origin of funds……………………………..

    Yours Faithfully

    SPECIAL AGENT (admin division)
    Colleen M. Conyngham
    (BADGE NUMBER JTT047101111)
    FOR FBI DIRECTOR
    ROBERT S MUELLER

    test


    cc: general intelligence department (GID)
    cc federal bureau of investigation (fFBIi)
    cc .internet crime complaint center (ic3)
    cc: Asia pacific group on money laundering (APG)
    cc: international monetary fund (IMF)
    cc: international organization of securities commissions (IOSCO)
    cc: international banking security association (IBSA)
    cc: world customs organization (WCO)
    cc: inter-American development bank (IADB)
    cc: national white collar crime center (NW3C)
    cc: bureau of justice assistance (BJA)
    cc: supreme court of South Africa(SCA)

    vvy

    LEGAL NOTICE:
    Unless expressly stated otherwise, this message is confidential and may be privileged. It is intended for the addressee(s) only. Access to this e-mail by anyone else is unauthorized. If you are not an addressee, any disclosure or copying of the contents or any action taken (or not taken) in reliance on it is unauthorized and may be unlawful. If you are not an addressee, please inform the sender immediately.

    AVISO LEGAL:
    Salvo que se indique lo contrario, este mensaje es confidencial y puede ser privilegiada. Se pretende a su destinatario (s)solamente. El acceso a este e-mail por cualquier otra persona no estб autorizado. Si usted no es un destinatario, cualquier divulgaciуn o copia de lacontenidos ni de cualquier acciуn realizada (o no) en la dependencia en que no estб autorizado y puede ser ilegal. Si no son unadestinatario, por favor notifique al remitente de inmediato


    DO NOT PRINT /FORWARD THIS MAIL ITS AGAINST THE LAW
    This e-mail, including any attachments, is covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 10 U.S.C. 2510-2521
    __________________________________________________ _____
    ----Original Message-----
    From: F.B.I WASHINGTON D.C [mailto:fbiwashdc@fbi.gov]
    Sent: 13 July 2013 11:03
    To: undisclosed-recipients:
    Subject: F.B.I- FINAL REMINDER NOTICE,,
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  8. #82
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Top 10 online scams in video format.

    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  9. #83
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    SCAMMER fnbmphokagisohenry@hotmail.co.za

    SHHHHHHHH!!!

    It is Highly Confidential
    It is my pleasure to inform you that i have finally succeeded in transferring of the huge funds under the cooperation of a new partner from London, United Kingdom. and I decided to write a Cashier Bank Draft$1.500,000.USD.for your compensation. Have you received it? Contact my Account Officer, F.N.B. (First National Bank South Africa)
    Contact: Mr. Mpho K Henry,
    His email address: (fnbmphokagisohenry@hotmail.co.za)
    Cell No:+27846667737
    Ask him to send you the Bank Draft of $1.500, 000. USD, which I kept under his supervision for your compensation.
    Regards,
    Barr. Adams Winter.
    IF FOUND IN SPAM/JUNK PLEASE MARK AS INBOX.

    Name : Barr Adams Winter.
    E-mail : fnbmphokagisohenry@hotmail.co.za,pet...365883.ovh.net

    ============================================
    SCAMMER engranthony_nnpc@rediffmail.com
    SCAMMER becky@eurogarment.com.cn
    SCAMMER olive@dgljp.sinanet.com


    Friday, July 12, 2013
    From Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC)
    Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation
    Nigerian Petroleum Exchange
    NNPC Towers, Central Business District,
    Herbert Macaulay Way,
    P.M.B. 190, Garki, Abuja
    Ref: NNPC/NPE/R&P/TAM-00894/13
    Contract No.: NNPC/TAM/RWPK-089/06/13

    Dear Sir,

    NNPC REFINERIES TURN-AROUND MAINTENANCE OVER-INVOICE

    Following the removal of fuel subsidy in Nigerian Petroleum price that caused an increase in fuel price from US$0.40 to US$0.87 per litre in January 2012, the Federal Government decided to use the subsidy money for the purpose of Turn-Around Maintenance (TAM) for their three refineries in Warri, Port Harcourt and Kaduna and the sum of US$2.6 billion were set out for this purpose.

    However, the contract was awarded to JGC Engineering, Japan and the entire contract bidding process, terms and agreements was reached with the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC), Nigerian Government and two refineries has started production already, while the remaining refinery is expected to start production on October this year.

    Meanwhile, the contract for Turn-Around Maintenance (TAM) for the three refineries awarded to the JGC Engineering had an over-invoice sum of US$150,000,000.00, and I told the NNPC Board that, this amount belongs to one of our suppliers of Pipelines, who are yet to be paid, and they requested that the supplier/contractor should come for his money, if not they shall return it to the Government coffer Account as un-used fund, that is why I am contacting you to act as the supplier that executed this contract, and I shall provide you with all the necessary information you need to know.

    Based on that, I want to use this medium to inform you that the over-invoiced sum of US$150,000,000.00 have been approved by the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) for release to you for the supplies of the Turn-Around Maintenance Pipelines to the Port Harcourt, Warri and Kaduna Refineries, and I want your maximum cooperation and trust.

    Lastly, this transaction is highly confidential, because I will not entertain any form of illegal approach from unintended individual or person. Upon the receipt of your response I shall further detail you the procedures for receiving this fund from the NNPC. Meanwhile, the sharing ratio of this fund will be on 50:50 bases. Your expedite response will be appreciated. Thanks for your understanding.

    Yours truly.

    Engr. Anthony U. Ogbuigwe,
    Group Executive Director, Refineries & Petrochemicals
    Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC)

    Name : Engr. Anthony U. Ogbuigwe
    E-mail : engranthony_nnpc@rediffmail.com,beck...jp.sinanet.com
    ============================================
    SCAMMER h112@globomail.com
    SCAMMER diplomatthomasluck56@yahoo.fr


    Friday, July 12, 2013
    YOUR PACKAGE HAS ARRIVED SUCCESSFULLY.CALL ME BACK URGENT WITH THIS (601-385-1279.
    YOUR PACKAGE HAS ARRIVED SUCCESSFULLY.CALL ME BACK URGENT WITH THIS (601-385-1279.

    Attention: I'm Diplomatic Agent MR.Thomas Lucky; I have been trying to reach you on your Email about four hours now, just to inform you about my successful arrival in Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD), Sterling, VA 20166, USA, with your box of consignment worth $3.6 Million Dollars which I have been instructed by I.C EXPRESS COURIER DELIVERY COMPANY to be delivered to you. The Airport Authority demanded for all the legal back up papers to prove to them that the fund is no way related with drug nor fraud money, I have presented the papers I handed to them and they are very much pleased with the papers I presented but the only thing that is still keeping me here is the airport Antidrug/terrorist clearance certificate and International Clearance Delivery Permit which is not placed on the package, one of the Airport Authority has advise that we get the delivery tag so that I can exit the airport immediately and make my delivery successful .I try to reason with them and they stated the delivery tag will cost us just $170 Dollars only to get the two documents placed on the packages as that documents will enable me. Please try as much as you can to reach me on Phone below as I can not afford to spend much time here . You can direct the tag fee to our Head Office as they will get it here for you and they are entitled to receive and make any payment to foreign countries authority. Email me with below information to enable me know your arrangement for the $170. EMAIL :(diplomatthomasluck56@yahoo.fr) Meanwhile you are advice to reconfirm the below information upon contacting us to avoid delivery to wrong person.

    1- Your Full Name
    2- Your Delivery Address
    3- Your Contact Telephone Number
    4- Your Occupation
    5- Your Identification (Passport number or ID Card number)

    Below is the information where the payment of $170 will be transfer to Federal Ministry of Finance Benin Republic where the Tag Deliver will be issue in your name.Here is the receiver information's

    1.RECEIVER NAME:.........Emma Ochie
    2.COUNTRY:............. Benin Republic.
    3.CITY :...............Porto Novo.
    4..TEST QUESTION:...How Long
    5.TEST ANSWER:......Today
    MTCN:...............
    SENDER NAME:...............
    Amount.................$170

    Email me the payment information as soon as you made the payment available to the name of Ms Catherine Douglass in Federal Ministry of Finance.
    Email :(diplomatthomasluck56@yahoo.fr)
    Regard
    DIPLOMATIC MR.Thomas Lucky.
    Call me with this below number (601)-385-1279

    Name : MR.Thomas Lucky.
    E-mail : h112@globomail.com,diplomatthomasluck56@yahoo.fr

    Friday, July 12, 2013
    INSTRUCTION TO RELEASE YOUR INHERITANCE FUND
    INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND (IMF)
    P.O.Box 3100, Akintola Complex Ekoyi Lagos
    Phone: +2347065631569
    Email: imf.feedback1@helixnet.cn
    REF:-XVGNN8809
    ============================================
    SCAMMER imf.feedback1@helixnet.cn
    SCAMMER imf.feedback@hotmail.com

    INSTRUCTION TO RELEASE YOUR INHERITANCE FUND

    Attention Beneficiary,

    This is to intimate you of a very important information which will be of a great help to redeem you from all the difficulties you have been experiencing in getting your long overdue payment due to excessive demand for money from you by both corrupt Bank officials and Courier Companies after which your fund remain unpaid to you. I am Mr. Wayne Mitchell Mr. Michael Dede a highly placed official of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). It may interest you to know that reports have reached our office by so many correspondences on the uneasy way which people like you are treated by Various Banks and Courier Companies/ Diplomat across Europe to Africa, America, Asia /London Uk and we have decided to put a stop to that and that is why I was appointed to handle your transaction here in Ghana.

    All Governmental and Non-Governmental prostates, NGOs, Finance Companies, Banks, Security Companies and Courier companies which have been in contact with you of late have been instructed to back up from your transaction and you have been advised NOT to respond to them anymore since the IMF is now directly in charge of your payment. You are hereby advised NOT to remit further payment to any institutions with respect to your transaction as your fund will be transferred to you directly from our source here and your present will be required here .

    I hope this is clear. Any action contrary to this instruction is at your own risk.Reconfirm the information bellow and forward it this e-mail (imf.feedback1@helixnet.cn) with immediate effect and we shall give you further details on how your fund will be released.

    1.Full Name:............................................. ........
    2.Address:........................................ ...............
    3Nationality:..................................... ..............
    4.Age:........Date of Birth:.....................................
    5.Occupation:..................................... ...............
    6.Phone:...............Mobile:.............:...... .............Fax:...............
    7.State of Origin:......................Country:............. ....
    8. Amount:........................................... .............................................
    9. Copy of your identity Card

    Regards,
    Mr. Wayne Mitchell.

    Name : Mr. Wayne Mitchell
    E-mail : imf.feedback1@helixnet.cn,imf.feedback@hotmail.com

    All linked from https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam/340470669393547
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  10. #84
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Everything You Need to Know About Obamacare Scams

    Sean Boulger
    July 12, 2013

    Later this year, the Affordable Care Act (often known as Obamacare) is going to take effect. This is a significant change in American healthcare policy, and scammers have been taking advantage of the confusion to commit all kinds of fraud and identity theft.

    In fact, the FTC has found that healthcare fraud has been on the rise lately, and will likely continue to increase until October. Let’s talk about how to spot the scams and avoid any problems when you’re ready to make the switch over to Obamacare.


    The Obamacare Card Scam

    One of the most popular healthcare scams that’s been circulating as the October 1st Affordable Care Act deadline approaches is known as the “Obamacare card.” It’s a technique used by fraudsters to steal consumers’ credit card information and Social Security numbers.

    How does the Obamacare card scam work? Basically, victims get a phone call from someone claiming to represent the government. The caller informs them that they need this insurance card to be eligible for coverage under the Affordable Care Act, or they may say the Obamacare card provides extra discounts. They ask for private personal information so they can send you the card.

    But there’s no such thing as an Obamacare card — you’re just giving your info to scammers and identity thieves.
    A color photo of the White House.

    Obama care goes into effect in October, and the FTC expects the number of related scams to rise in the meantime.
    The Information Update Scam

    Another popular scam involves fraudsters posing as Medicare officials. These fake Medicare representatives call consumers and say they’re updating or verifying personal information. The consumers are told that they might face some sort of consequence if they don’t comply.

    The Sacramento Bee has more:

    “…impostors claiming to be from Medicare told consumers they needed to hand over their personal or financial information in order to continue eligibility because ‘change is on the horizon.’

    But nothing in the Affordable Care Act threatens existing benefits or medicare Enrollees…”

    In other words, you shouldn’t be getting any Medicare calls because of the Affordable Care Act. If you have concerns about your Medicare benefits, don’t respond to a cold-caller. Instead, contact your Medicare representatives directly.


    Fake Coverage and Mandatory Payments Scams
    A color photo of someone holding a stethoscope up to a piggy bank.

    If someone calls you out of the blue to sell “Obamacare insurance,” they may be a scammer.

    Some of the most audacious scammers are even selling fake coverage. That’s right — if you’re not careful, you might accidentally buy healthcare coverage that doesn’t actually exist.

    Other fraudsters are simply calling people and telling them they need to pay fees to have their Affordable Care Act healthcare benefits take effect. They may ask the victim to wire them money via Western Union or a prepaid card.

    Some scammers will even tell their victims may go to jail if they don’t pay the fees. This is obviously completely bogus, and it’s a sad example of how scammers advantage of the widespread confusion and misinformation surrounding Obamacare.


    Fake Navigators Scam

    As part of the Affordable Healthcare Act, the government is sponsoring the training and certification of so-called “navigators” who will help consumers get their new healthcare set up. However, this program hasn’t started yet.

    Some scammers are calling consumers, pretending to be navigators, and asking for service fees up front. Remember, the real navigators program hasn’t started yet operating yet — and when it does, it will be free to the public.


    Know How to Protect Yourself

    One reason these scammers are getting away with their dirty healthcare tricks is because many people don’t know much about the Affordable Care Act or what it really means.

    By going online and educating yourself about the Affordable Care Act, you can spot the scams and protect yourself and your family. Check out HHS.gov/healthcare to learn about the Affordable Care Act, how it will affect your current health insurance or what it will mean if you don’t currently have insurance.

    Meanwhile, click here watch our Scambook TV video for more information about Obamacare Health Scams.

    Do you have any tips for dodging Obamacare scams? What do you think about the Affordable Healthcare Act? Let us know in the comments.
    - See more at: Everything You Need to Know About Obamacare Scams
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Someone PM'd me this on FB.

    SCAMMER general_david15@live.com


    Subject: I REALLY NEED YOUR HELP.
    Date: Fri, 5 Jul 2013 00:54:58 -0700

    Hello My Dearest.

    Thanks for your reply, my dear I told you about my plane for an investment in your country and that i want the fund to be secured. Presently i am here in the military camp Mali for peacekeeping mission due to the crisis in Mali. Secondly i want to relocate with you to start up a good business venture that will be profit oriented.

    My lovely darling i need more prove and trust, don't be angry, because i want to handle my future to you. I appreciate your concern and your willingness so far for assisting me, the most important thing i need from you right now is your honesty and trustworthiness, I choose you in this transaction, based on my present status here as an air Force General who lead the troop. I want you to understand more about my situation here in the military camp, I can only email you from the office, as we are not allow to use mobile phone here, we make use of radio message and it is only USA soldiers and people from the USA white house, that can communicate with us through radio message.

    Now my dear due to my political situation as an army General staying in the war zone for peacekeeping mission, i need a foreigner who will stand on my behalf and receive the Trunk Box and also help me invest it in her country, that is why i decided to make this contact with you, for you to stand on my behalf and receive the Treasure Box. Everything concerning the delivery of the consignment is clear. Moreover i went into serious discussion with the United Nation Diplomat here who will deliver the consignment to you, the legal United Nation Diplomat told me that in a situations like mine, that the best solution is by soliciting for assistance of a reliable foreigner who can help me receive the consignment box in his place.

    I then decided to contact you, hoping that with your advanced knowledge we can be able to work together so that if all things works out for us, we can go into life partnership if you wish because that is one of the reason i registered the site. Though it took me time to make up my mind to contact you and offered you this proposal of mine. It is due to the trust i have in you that made me to disclosed this matter with you, believing that i am save in your hand, no body knows what i have, PLEASE i am asking you for my safety and security KEEP IT VERY PRIVATE OKAY, i know that God will see us through.

    Finally, I am suggesting that if we can go into life partnership as time goes on which means that the proceedings from the investment in your country shall be shared equally between the both of us because i do not know much about international business and i am putting my entire Fund to your care because i want you to be in total control of my fund as soon as the fund arrives in your country. Again, do attach as you reply to me your full name and full contact information's to enable me give it to the United Nation diplomat who will be delivery the consignment to you. Please i will like you to send me your full data such as.

    1: Your Full Name
    2: Home Address
    3: Direct Phone Number
    4: Your Profession
    5: Scan copy of your international passport or Identity Card.

    On reply of your mail with your above mentioned details, I will contact the diplomat who will bring the consignment to you and give him your details, so that he will start the journey to deliver the fund in your place, hand to hand (Face to Face). Looking forward to read from you. Take good care of your self and remain bless.

    Forever Yours.
    Gen. David Rodriguez.

    And here is some fun stuff, cause why not.

    some fun stuff.JPG
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Brass claimed to have a "can't lose investment formula" and O'Keefe trusted her-no questions asked. "On paper we certainly made money. We received continual statements. She would come to our house, sit down at our dining room table and go over our statements with us."

    About a year and half later, everything changed. "There were checks that had bounced… We accepted what seemed like plausible reasons for that," said O'Keefe. "In retrospect should have been enormous flags to us."

    Con Artists Targeting Victims in Unlikely Places
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    The latest 419 scam targets paranoia about crime. A victim receives an SMS, ostensibly from a "hit man" who has been hired by the recipient's enemies.

    The hit man claims to know where the person lives, works and shops. He vows to kill the recipient of the message unless he or she buys him off.

    On Friday, a frantic 79-year-old Durban woman made her way to the bank to deposit R15000 into the account of a hit man hired by "someone close" to her.

    Her son stopped her but could not convince her that she was safe.

    "The man has my phone number and knows where I live. He will kill me. I rather just pay him so I can sleep at night," she said.

    Her son said though his mother could not think of anyone who wanted to kill her she refused to believe it was a scam.

    "I really feel for my mother. There are so many people out there that don't recognise these scams. These con artists know that people in South Africa are always afraid, even in their own homes, so they are now using that against us."

    A senior lecturer in criminology and forensics at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Dr Nirmala Gopal, said South Africans are paranoid about crime and the possibility of being murdered. Gopal added that people are more susceptible to 419 scams that are new.

    "Another argument is that many of them may be ignorant of this modus operandi."

    KwaZulu-Natal police spokesman Colonel Jay Naicker confirmed cases in which 419 con artists posed as hit men to extort money from victims.

    "In many of those cases, sting operations were set up and the perpetrators were arrested," he said.

    Naicker said there were no separate statistics on 419 scams as they fell under police records of extortion, intimidation or fraud.

    According to the South African Police Service website, the many 419 scams that flood e-mail boxes are generally ignored by most internet users.

    "But the fact is that many people fall victim to these scams and lose thousands of rands.

    "The Nigerian 419 scam is currently the world's largest scam in terms of monetary losses; 419 fraudsters are arrested continually throughout South Africa as well as around the world."

    One of the most predominant 419 scams claims that the e-mailrecipient has been left an inheritance or won the lottery - but the funds can only be released upon receipt of a "small" amount of cash and banking details.

    The 419 "pay up or die" hit man scam first emerged in the US, Australia and Canada in 2008.

    Computer forensic expert Danny Myburgh said the scammers may have set their sights on South Africa because they had exhausted their opportunities elsewhere in the world.

    "The hit man scam is becoming very common. We get queries every day and it is very difficult to convince people that there is no hit man after them," he said.

    Myburgh said the con artists behind such scams are able to buy cellphone numbers legitimately.

    "Databases are sold to marketing companies so they can get numbers that way. Or they could pick random numbers."

    'Pay up or die' scam hits SA - Times LIVE
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Darien grandfather scammed out of $4,500 Darien grandfather scammed out of $4,500 | Darien Times

    By David DesRoches on July 15, 2013 in Lead News, Police & Fire · 0 Comments

    A person posing as a Danbury police officer extorted $4,500 from an 81-year-old Darien man after the victim was told that the police had his grandchild in custody and needed money for his grandchild’s release.

    Police said the conman called the grandfather at 11:22 a.m. on Thursday, July 11, and told him his grandson had been arrested, and provided the name of one of the man’s grandchildren. The conman then asked the grandfather to wire him $2,250 from Walmart via a money gram, to which the grandfather complied.

    About three hours later, the conman, still claiming to be a police officer, called back, saying he needed an additional $2,250 for release of the man’s grandchild. The grandfather again complied, police said.

    Police traced the call and it came back to cell phone registered in Canada. Determining the location the money was received was difficult, police said, although it appears it was picked up somewhere in Georgia.

    In April last year, police responded to two similar cases in two weeks. In one instance, a victim sent $12,500 to Lima, Peru, through Western Union. The caller claimed to be Officer David Rogers of the Buffalo, N.Y., police department, advising the victim that his grandson Joey needed bail money.

    In another instance, a woman was scammed out of $2,500, also by someone reportedly in Peru. In last year’s incidents, the grifters pretended to be the people’s grandchildren.
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Color me skeptical, but believing people are genius investors based on internet rhetoric never ends well.

    Is This the Worst Ponzi Scheme Ever? Is This the Worst Ponzi Scheme Ever? -- Daily Intelligencer

    By Kevin Roose

    It's possible that this story by the Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation's Roddy Boyd, about an Akron, Ohio–based hedge-fund manager named Anthony Davian, describes the worst Ponzi scheme in history.

    I don't mean "worst" in the sense of involving the most money, or hurting the most investors. Those superlatives still belong to Bernie Madoff. And since no charges have (yet) been filed against Davian Capital Advisors, there's no ironclad proof that his hedge fund is actually a Ponzi scheme, or even fraudulent. Still, Boyd assembles a pretty compelling case that Davian is up there with the all-time greats when it comes to the sheer obviousness of his scheme, and the transparency of his cover-up.

    Data points counting against Davian include:

    – He uses "used social media — Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other services — to share ideas and market his two funds," and publishes a newsletter for day traders.

    – On one of said social media accounts, he had a habit of posting "Ching!" every time he made money on a trade.

    – He made YouTube videos under the heading "Financial Rockstar." They look like this.

    – His firm's chief financial officer wasn't permitted to see the fund's bank accounts.

    – Davian claimed at one point that his fund had a Sharpe ratio (a measurement of variability of reward) of 6. When it was pointed out to him that given the size of his fund and the returns he claimed to have, that Sharpe ratio was mathematically impossible, he removed it from his marketing materials.

    – Davian insisted he had four employees, but wouldn't make any of them available for interviews.

    – Davian has, at times, claimed his fund had $200 million under management, $5 million under management, and between $150 million and $200 million in "assets owned or managed by" his newsletter clients.

    – After missing two scheduled interviews, Davian told Boyd that he had been the victim of a "near=death experience" that had landed him on life support until July 10. When Boyd asked how, then, Davian had been able to send him an e-mail from his iPad on July 9, Davian had no answer.

    – Davian does appear to have spent some time in a hospital. Shortly after investigators latched onto his fund and seized hard drives from his office, Boyd reports that his wife "found him passed out in their car suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning."

    Certain of my colleagues might classify Davian's Akron-based investing capers as par for the course in Ohio. As both a native Ohioan and a guy who gets a lot of SEC press releases, I can assure you that financial frauds happen everywhere.

    Usually, though, they're not quite this dumb.
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Mortage Fraud Scam West Jordan Attorney Charged With Massive Mortgage Fraud | KUTV.com

    Investigators say for nearly six years Jeremy Eveland allegedly convinced people who were late on their mortgages to unwittingly sign their homes over to him, his family members or employees, and then the families were kicked out of their homes.

    Tax Fraud Scam -the below link is to the FTC which provides reference on several variations of Debt/Tax scams.

    Tax Relief Companies | Consumer Information

    Tax relief companies use the radio, television and the internet to advertise help for taxpayers in distress. If you pay them an upfront fee, which can be thousands of dollars, these companies claim they can reduce or even eliminate your tax debts and stop back-tax collection by applying for legitimate IRS hardship programs. The truth is that most taxpayers don't qualify for the programs these fraudsters hawk, their companies don't settle the tax debt, and in many cases don't even send the necessary paperwork to the IRS requesting participation in the programs that were mentioned. Adding insult to injury, some of these companies don't provide refunds, and leave people even further in debt.

    Some taxpayers who filed complaints with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reported that, after signing up with some of these companies and paying thousands of dollars in upfront fees, the companies took even more of their money by making unauthorized charges to their credit cards or withdrawals from their bank accounts.

    If you owe back taxes and don't know how you're going to pay the debt, the FTC, the nation's consumer protection agency, says don't panic, take a deep breath, and consider your options. If you are having trouble paying bills, it's often better to try to work out a payment plan with the creditor yourself than to pay someone else to negotiate a plan for you. The same is true when you owe money to the IRS or your state comptroller.
    IRS Help for Taxpayers

    If you owe taxes, but can’t pay the IRS in full, consider submitting an Installment Agreement Request (Form 9465) with your return. In certain situations, the IRS can’t deny a request for an installment agreement if you owe less than $10,000. That said, you should still pay as much as you can with the return. You will be charged interest and possibly a late payment penalty on any tax not paid by its due date, even if your request for an installment agreement is approved. You can avoid IRS collection notices and actions, like a Notice of Federal Tax Lien or an IRS levy, by establishing an installment agreement upfront and making your installment payments.

    If you owe back taxes, there are several IRS tax relief programs to help, including the agency’s Fresh Start initiative:

    An Installment Agreement is generally available to people who can't pay their tax debt in full at one time. The program allows people to make smaller monthly payments until the entire debt is satisfied.
    Under its Fresh Start initiative, the IRS raised the threshold for streamlined installment agreements from $25,000 to $50,000 in tax debt, and the maximum repayment term from five to six years. Taxpayers who owe less than $50,000 may apply online with the IRS and don’t have to complete an IRS Collection Information Statement (Form 433-A, 433-B or Form 433-F).
    An Offer in Compromise (OIC) lets taxpayers permanently settle their tax debt for less than the amount they owe. The OIC is an important tool to help people in limited circumstances; taxpayers are eligible only after other payment options have been exhausted.
    Under its Fresh Start initiative, the IRS expanded the OIC program to cover a larger group of struggling taxpayers. However, the IRS will not accept an offer if it believes the liability can be paid in full as a lump sum or through an installment agreement. The IRS offers guidance on choosing a tax professional for an OIC on its website.

    In very limited circumstances, the IRS may offer penalty abatement to people who haven't paid their taxes because of a special hardship. If the taxpayer meets very narrow criteria, the IRS may agree to forgive the penalties. Interest abatement is even more limited and rarely provided. While these programs may eliminate penalties or interest, you still owe the taxes. If a tax relief company promises it can eliminate interest and/or penalties for you, be wary: there is limited relief available, no matter who represents you before IRS Collections. Their services should include a face-to-face meeting with you where they explain your options and their fee structure.

    According to the IRS, you can apply for an Installment Agreement, OIC, or penalty or interest abatement without the help of a third party. If you prefer third-party assistance in negotiating with the IRS, only certain tax professionals — Enrolled Agents (federally-authorized tax practitioners who can represent taxpayers before all administrative levels of the IRS), Certified Public Accountants (CPAs), and attorneys — have the authority to represent you . Their services should involve a face to face meeting where they explain your options and their fee structure.

    If you are asked to make an upfront payment for representation in a tax collection matter, carefully review the refund policy before signing any agreement. Also check to see if a default billing rate — a flat rate applied to the work of all employees at a firm, not only the tax professionals — will apply if you cancel the company’s services. A high default billing rate may quickly use up a large portion of your upfront payment, even early in the representation.

    Contact the Taxpayer Advocate Service, an independent organization within the IRS, for free help if you are having tax problems that you haven’t been able to resolve yourself, if your problems are causing financial difficulties for you or your business, or you face an immediate threat of adverse collection action by the IRS. Call 1-877-777-4778 or visit irs.gov/advocate.
    State Tax Relief Programs

    The process for tax settlements with the states is very similar to the process with the IRS, although it varies from state to state. In some states, for instance, a taxpayer's penalties can be waived, but interest can't. In other states, interest can be waived, but penalties can't. And in some states, legitimate tax debt can't be reduced at all. For more information, contact your state comptroller. For a state-by-state listing, visit the National Association of State Auditors, Comptrollers and Treasurers (NASACT) at nasact.org.
    Problems with Tax Relief Companies and Representatives

    The IRS Office of Professional Responsibility targets questionable practices in the tax debt resolution industry. Report problems to the IRS on Form 14157, Complaint: Tax Return Preparer. The IRS Return Preparer Office will process the complaint and, if appropriate, submit it to the IRS Office of Professional Responsibility for investigation.

    Behavior warranting a complaint to the IRS includes companies or individuals that:

    promise that you will get relief from tax liabilities;
    misrepresent how long it will take to process a debt relief request application; or
    omit relevant asset information on financial statements submitted to the IRS.

    You also may file a complaint with the FTC online or by phone: call 1-877-FTC-HELP. The FTC enters consumer complaints into the Consumer Sentinel Network, a secure online database and investigative tool used by hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.
    Taxpayer Tips

    If you owe back taxes and are having trouble meeting your tax obligation:

    read your notices from the IRS or your state comptroller. Ask those agencies about collection alternatives.
    save yourself some aggravation by ignoring promises from businesses that say you "qualify" for a tax relief program to resolve your tax debt. Only the IRS or your state comptroller can make that determination. Read the IRS Offer in Compromise Booklet, Form 656-B, and use this IRS online tool to see if you may be eligible for an offer in compromise.
    think twice if the entire fee for services is requested upfront with no explanation of how services will be billed or whether a refund of unearned fees will be made.

    For More Information

    The IRS has additional information on the collection process and payment options at irs.gov.

    Publication 594, The IRS Collection Process, has information on options available to taxpayers, and the IRS YouTube channel has a video with helpful information, as well.
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Security Expert Warns of Criminals Using Facebook to Plan Home Burglaries
    Security Expert Warns of Criminals Using Facebook to Plan Home Burglaries | Facecrooks.com | How to Avoid Facebook Scams
    July 16, 2013

    in Internet Safety & Privacy

    alertWhile the first impulse for many vacationers is to share every detail about their trip on social media sites like Facebook, security expert David Walsh warns that tech-savvy criminals could see your posts and use it as a reason to break into your home. Walsh, chief executive of security monitoring service Net Watch, said vacationers need to be particularly careful in the summer months, when home break-in numbers rise due to vacations and holidays.

    “You may think that checking in at the airport is a nice way to let your friends and family know that you’re going on holiday, but in reality you are also letting people know that your home is empty and an easy target,” he said. “If you want to share your holiday plans, don’t do it in real time, wait until you are safely home.”

    According to police, some burglars search Facebook using keywords that help to reveal whether someone is traveling or not, or even look at who has checked in at airports using Foursquare. In this time of online oversharing, it’s only natural that criminals would catch on and take advantage. In fact, according to an infographic put together by door company Distinctive Doors, around 75 percent of convicted burglars believe other robbers are using social media to find and scope out their targets. While it’s nice to tell everyone back home about your tropical trip, it might be best to wait until you’re actually home to post those photo albums
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    The 9 Bad Email Habits That Expose You to Scams and Identity Theft

    Sean O'Connor
    July 11, 2013


    What do your email habits say about you? We often take it for granted that our emails stay private and secure, but the truth is that bad email habits can expose you to a variety of threats. Careless emailing can result in phishing scams, computer viruses or even identity theft and financial fraud.

    Is your email placing you at risk? Yahoo! Finance compiled a list of the worst consumer email activities you should never do. Check out our list of the 9 bad email habits that expose you to scams and identity theft, and out if you’re doing any of them!


    1. Checking Your Email on a Unsafe WiFi Network
    Cafe

    The local café isn’t the safest place to check your email

    Any public cafes, libraries, or airports with public WiFi networks are vulnerable to hackers, even if it’s password protected. You never know how many cyber scammers might be connecting to the same network.

    Only check your email on safe, secure networks you can trust.

    If you really need to check your email and you can’t wait until you get back to your home or the office, make sure you’ve got up-to-date antivirus software and a firewall installed on your computer.


    2. Staying Signed into Your Email Account

    It’s a drag to log in every time you need to check your email, especially if you often use email on an iPhone or other mobile device, but staying automatically signed in leaves your personal information vulnerable to hackers. Sign out whenever possible to better protect yourself.


    3. Repeat Your Email Login and Password on Other Sites

    Fact: Sites from Facebook to LivingSocial have been hacked before, exposing user data to identity theft and other privacy problems. That’s why it’s very important that you don’t repeat your email username and email password on other sites. If you do, a hacker could use the information stolen from these sites to compromise your email account.

    Always stay away from repeating the same username and password across your accounts. Want to know how to create a super-secure, but easy to remember password? Check out our Scambook TV video for a quick tip!


    4. Keeping Old Emails Instead of Trashing Them

    With providers like Gmail offering up gigabits of free space, most of us don’t delete old emails. But it’s a smart idea to change this habit. According to Yahoo! Finance, here’s why:

    “Those messages may contain addresses, account usernames and passwords, contact information for all your friends, financial data and a host of other sensitive information.”

    Send them to the trash or delete folder, then empty it on a regular basis.


    5. Falling for Spam Credit Card Offers or Guaranteed Loans

    To start, no trustworthy creditor will offer you a credit deal without checking your credit scores first, and you should always be suspicious about unsolicited emails.

    Those low interest rate credit card offer emails and “guaranteed loans” are just scammers trying to steal your information. Send these emails to the trash or mark them as spam.
    Man and Binary Code

    Our email addresses are important. Keep it safe and protect yourself from dealing with the headache of a hacked email.


    6. Replying When Old Friends Suddenly Email You for Help

    That email from a long lost friend who’s stuck in China and desperate for cash? Trash it. This is a common email scam. Hackers take control of someone’s email account, then use it to email everyone on the victim’s contact list with a fake story about needing money abroad.

    If you think your friend might really be stuck in a bad financial situation overseas, ask them a question only they could know the answer to, reach out to them via Facebook or a different email, or contact a mutual friend to verify the story.

    If they want you to wire money via Western Union — especially if they want you to wire the money to a different name — it’s definitely a scam.


    7. Verifying Private Personal Info Through Email

    An email from a bank, a service like FedEx, or the IRS asking for your personal information is most likely a phishing scam. These institutions don’t ask for personal information via unsolicited email. Delete the email and alert the company’s fraud department about the suspicious email.


    8. Getting Tricked into Believing Your Credit Card Was Stolen

    If you receive an email that says “Thank you for your recent order!”, but you never ordered anything, DO NOT try to cancel the order within the email. This is a common identity theft scheme.

    If you’re really worried that you may be a victim of fraud, remember to check your credit report for free at www.AnnualCreditReport.com.


    9. Falling For Amazing Travel Deal Emails

    Travel is expensive for a reason and no company can book you a weekend in Waikiki for less than a hundred bucks. Is the deal too good to be true? Send it to the trash. The deal is a scam and the email may steal your personal information or download a virus onto your computer. If you’re really curious, search for the deal or the company on sites like Scambook to find out if it’s legitimate.


    What Do You Think?

    Do you have any email horror stories? Have long lost friends contacted you by email about their penniless situation in China? What are your tips to increase your email security? Let us know in the comments.
    - See more at: The 9 Bad Email Habits That Expose You to Scams and Identity Theft
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Beware of fraudsters operating a loan fee scam Beware of fraudsters operating a loan fee scam | Action Fraud

    Online cash provider Ukash is urging people to be on the lookout for fraudsters claiming to be from The Start-ups Loan Company and other loan providers [17 July 2013]

    Beware of fraudsters operating a loan fee scamThe official Start-Up Loans Company is a government backed organisation and is not associated with providing loans to individuals, but is one of the names fraudsters are using to operate this scam.

    The scammers have access to personal information provided to loan broker websites and claim to have approved a loan, but need a fee to be paid in advance before it can be processed.

    The fraudsters then ask for the fee to be paid by UKash vouchers. Ukash codes are purchased with cash in retail outlets such as shops, petrol stations and kiosks, and issued online from their website. You must not hand over your Ukash codes to these scammers, as you will lose your money.

    Miranda McLean, Marketing Director of Ukash said “People should only spend their Ukash with official merchants listed on website. No genuine loan company will ask for a fee to be paid in advance. Our advice is always that Ukash should never be used for payments to suspicious or unknown individuals. The simple message is to treat Ukash with the same security as you would physical cash.”

    Top tips on using Ukash safely

    Keep your Ukash codes secure, just like you do with cash.
    Only use Ukash at genuine partner websites, if you are not sure check their list.
    Never reveal the voucher code or any part of it to anyone else including over the phone, via email or letter, no matter how convincing they appear to be.
    Never give Ukash to individuals asking for payment up front.
    Only purchase Ukash from official Ukash issuing partners or the Ukash website, never from ‘exchange’ sites.

    For further information please visit the Ukash website.

    Please note that Action Fraud is not responsible for the content of external websites.

    To report a fraud and receive a police crime reference number, call Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or use our online fraud reporting tool.
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Last for now, you did not win the lottery. If someone tells you that you have to pay to collect your prize, you are about to be scammed.

    Capture.JPG

    slave.JPG
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    SCAMMER hyiprecover@gmail.com

    This is another fine example of Facebook letting people operate criminal enterprises in the open. I thank fellow scambuster Harrison for showing me this. This is a classic reload scam. When a Ponzi Scheme blows up, this piece of work (or one just like him) will swoop in and tell you that he can get your money back. I found him on Oil of Asia, Profitable Sunrise, and Banners Broker boards. No money to be had in any of those programs. NONE!!!

    These people will be ask for a fee, account information, and other personal details. Maybe they send you a check and ask you to send back their commission Western Union, the check will bounce. Maybe they hack your account and steal from you. Or most likely they will come up with some ruse where you send them money. They may claim to be law enforcement, attorneys, private detectives, all BS. You will lose twice it is just one more scam.

    https://www.facebook.com/hyip.recover?fref=ts
    1.JPG
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  22. #96
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    FBI — Common Fraud Schemes

    Top warnings from FBI on scams.

    These guys

    Ecusson FBI.jpg

    Not these guys, who have repeatedly lost ribshaw's application.

    fpi.JPG

    Home • Scams & Safety • Common Fraud Schemes

    The following are some of the most common scams that the FBI investigates and tips to help prevent you from being victimized. Visit our White-Collar Crime and Cyber webpages for more fraud schemes.

    To report cases of fraud, use our online tips form or contact your nearest FBI office or overseas office.

    Telemarketing Fraud

    When you send money to people you do not know personally or give personal or financial information to unknown callers, you increase your chances of becoming a victim of telemarketing fraud.

    Here are some warning signs of telemarketing fraud—what a caller may tell you:

    “You must act ‘now’ or the offer won’t be good.”
    “You’ve won a ‘free’ gift, vacation, or prize.” But you have to pay for “postage and handling” or other charges.
    “You must send money, give a credit card or bank account number, or have a check picked up by courier.” You may hear this before you have had a chance to consider the offer carefully.
    “You don’t need to check out the company with anyone.” The callers say you do not need to speak to anyone including your family, lawyer, accountant, local Better Business Bureau, or consumer protection agency.
    “You don’t need any written information about their company or their references.”
    “You can’t afford to miss this ‘high-profit, no-risk’ offer.”

    If you hear these or similar “lines” from a telephone salesperson, just say “no thank you” and hang up the telephone.

    Tips for Avoiding Telemarketing Fraud:

    It’s very difficult to get your money back if you’ve been cheated over the telephone. Before you buy anything by telephone, remember:

    Don’t buy from an unfamiliar company. Legitimate businesses understand that you want more information about their company and are happy to comply.
    Always ask for and wait until you receive written material about any offer or charity. If you get brochures about costly investments, ask someone whose financial advice you trust to review them. But, unfortunately, beware—not everything written down is true.
    Always check out unfamiliar companies with your local consumer protection agency, Better Business Bureau, state attorney general, the National Fraud Information Center, or other watchdog groups. Unfortunately, not all bad businesses can be identified through these organizations.
    Obtain a salesperson’s name, business identity, telephone number, street address, mailing address, and business license number before you transact business. Some con artists give out false names, telephone numbers, addresses, and business license numbers. Verify the accuracy of these items.
    Before you give money to a charity or make an investment, find out what percentage of the money is paid in commissions and what percentage actually goes to the charity or investment.
    Before you send money, ask yourself a simple question. “What guarantee do I really have that this solicitor will use my money in the manner we agreed upon?”
    Don’t pay in advance for services. Pay services only after they are delivered.
    Be wary of companies that want to send a messenger to your home to pick up money, claiming it is part of their service to you. In reality, they are taking your money without leaving any trace of who they are or where they can be reached.
    Always take your time making a decision. Legitimate companies won’t pressure you to make a snap decision.
    Don’t pay for a “free prize.” If a caller tells you the payment is for taxes, he or she is violating federal law.
    Before you receive your next sales pitch, decide what your limits are—the kinds of financial information you will and won’t give out on the telephone.
    Be sure to talk over big investments offered by telephone salespeople with a trusted friend, family member, or financial advisor. It’s never rude to wait and think about an offer.
    Never respond to an offer you don’t understand thoroughly.
    Never send money or give out personal information such as credit card numbers and expiration dates, bank account numbers, dates of birth, or social security numbers to unfamiliar companies or unknown persons.
    Be aware that your personal information is often brokered to telemarketers through third parties.
    If you have been victimized once, be wary of persons who call offering to help you recover your losses for a fee paid in advance.
    If you have information about a fraud, report it to state, local, or federal law enforcement agencies.

    For More information:
    - Telemarketing Fraud Targeting Seniors

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    Nigerian Letter or “419” Fraud

    Nigerian letter frauds combine the threat of impersonation fraud with a variation of an advance fee scheme in which a letter mailed from Nigeria offers the recipient the “opportunity” to share in a percentage of millions of dollars that the author—a self-proclaimed government official—is trying to transfer illegally out of Nigeria. The recipient is encouraged to send information to the author, such as blank letterhead stationery, bank name and account numbers, and other identifying information using a fax number provided in the letter. Some of these letters have also been received via e-mail through the Internet. The scheme relies on convincing a willing victim, who has demonstrated a “propensity for larceny” by responding to the invitation, to send money to the author of the letter in Nigeria in several installments of increasing amounts for a variety of reasons.

    Payment of taxes, bribes to government officials, and legal fees are often described in great detail with the promise that all expenses will be reimbursed as soon as the funds are spirited out of Nigeria. In actuality, the millions of dollars do not exist, and the victim eventually ends up with nothing but loss. Once the victim stops sending money, the perpetrators have been known to use the personal information and checks that they received to impersonate the victim, draining bank accounts and credit card balances. While such an invitation impresses most law-abiding citizens as a laughable hoax, millions of dollars in losses are caused by these schemes annually. Some victims have been lured to Nigeria, where they have been imprisoned against their will along with losing large sums of money. The Nigerian government is not sympathetic to victims of these schemes, since the victim actually conspires to remove funds from Nigeria in a manner that is contrary to Nigerian law. The schemes themselves violate section 419 of the Nigerian criminal code, hence the label “419 fraud.”

    Tips for Avoiding Nigerian Letter or “419” Fraud:

    If you receive a letter from Nigeria asking you to send personal or banking information, do not reply in any manner. Send the letter to the U.S. Secret Service, your local FBI office, or the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. You can also register a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission’s Complaint Assistant.
    If you know someone who is corresponding in one of these schemes, encourage that person to contact the FBI or the U.S. Secret Service as soon as possible.
    Be skeptical of individuals representing themselves as Nigerian or foreign government officials asking for your help in placing large sums of money in overseas bank accounts.
    Do not believe the promise of large sums of money for your cooperation.
    Guard your account information carefully.

    For More information:
    - Related Online Rental Ads Scheme
    - Related Spanish Lottery Scam

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    Identity Theft

    Identity theft occurs when someone assumes your identity to perform a fraud or other criminal act. Criminals can get the information they need to assume your identity from a variety of sources, including by stealing your wallet, rifling through your trash, or by compromising your credit or bank information. They may approach you in person, by telephone, or on the Internet and ask you for the information.

    The sources of information about you are so numerous that you cannot prevent the theft of your identity. But you can minimize your risk of loss by following a few simple hints.

    Tips for Avoiding Identity Theft:

    Never throw away ATM receipts, credit statements, credit cards, or bank statements in a usable form.
    Never give your credit card number over the telephone unless you make the call.
    Reconcile your bank account monthly, and notify your bank of discrepancies immediately.
    Keep a list of telephone numbers to call to report the loss or theft of your wallet, credit cards, etc.
    Report unauthorized financial transactions to your bank, credit card company, and the police as soon as you detect them.
    Review a copy of your credit report at least once each year. Notify the credit bureau in writing of any questionable entries and follow through until they are explained or removed.
    If your identity has been assumed, ask the credit bureau to print a statement to that effect in your credit report.
    If you know of anyone who receives mail from credit card companies or banks in the names of others, report it to local or federal law enforcement authorities.

    For more information:
    - Identity Theft webpage

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    Advance Fee Schemes

    An advance fee scheme occurs when the victim pays money to someone in anticipation of receiving something of greater value—such as a loan, contract, investment, or gift—and then receives little or nothing in return.

    The variety of advance fee schemes is limited only by the imagination of the con artists who offer them. They may involve the sale of products or services, the offering of investments, lottery winnings, “found money,” or many other “opportunities.” Clever con artists will offer to find financing arrangements for their clients who pay a “finder’s fee” in advance. They require their clients to sign contracts in which they agree to pay the fee when they are introduced to the financing source. Victims often learn that they are ineligible for financing only after they have paid the “finder” according to the contract. Such agreements may be legal unless it can be shown that the “finder” never had the intention or the ability to provide financing for the victims.

    Tips for Avoiding Advanced Fee Schemes:

    If the offer of an “opportunity” appears too good to be true, it probably is. Follow common business practice. For example, legitimate business is rarely conducted in cash on a street corner.

    Know who you are dealing with. If you have not heard of a person or company that you intend to do business with, learn more about them. Depending on the amount of money that you plan on spending, you may want to visit the business location, check with the Better Business Bureau, or consult with your bank, an attorney, or the police.
    Make sure you fully understand any business agreement that you enter into. If the terms are complex, have them reviewed by a competent attorney.
    Be wary of businesses that operate out of post office boxes or mail drops and do not have a street address. Also be suspicious when dealing with persons who do not have a direct telephone line and who are never in when you call, but always return your call later.
    Be wary of business deals that require you to sign nondisclosure or non-circumvention agreements that are designed to prevent you from independently verifying the bona fides of the people with whom you intend to do business. Con artists often use non-circumvention agreements to threaten their victims with civil suit if they report their losses to law enforcement.

    For more information:
    - Work-at-Home Advance Fee Scheme
    - Cancer Research Advance Fee Scheme

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    Health Care Fraud or Health Insurance Fraud

    Medical Equipment Fraud:

    Equipment manufacturers offer “free” products to individuals. Insurers are then charged for products that were not needed and/or may not have been delivered.

    “Rolling Lab” Schemes:

    Unnecessary and sometimes fake tests are given to individuals at health clubs, retirement homes, or shopping malls and billed to insurance companies or Medicare.

    Services Not Performed:

    Customers or providers bill insurers for services never rendered by changing bills or submitting fake ones.

    Medicare Fraud:

    Medicare fraud can take the form of any of the health insurance frauds described above. Senior citizens are frequent targets of Medicare schemes, especially by medical equipment manufacturers who offer seniors free medical products in exchange for their Medicare numbers. Because a physician has to sign a form certifying that equipment or testing is needed before Medicare pays for it, con artists fake signatures or bribe corrupt doctors to sign the forms. Once a signature is in place, the manufacturers bill Medicare for merchandise or service that was not needed or was not ordered.

    Tips for Avoiding Health Care Fraud or Health Insurance Fraud:

    Never sign blank insurance claim forms.
    Never give blanket authorization to a medical provider to bill for services rendered.
    Ask your medical providers what they will charge and what you will be expected to pay out-of-pocket.
    Carefully review your insurer’s explanation of the benefits statement. Call your insurer and provider if you have questions.
    Do not do business with door-to-door or telephone salespeople who tell you that services of medical equipment are free.
    Give your insurance/Medicare identification only to those who have provided you with medical services.
    Keep accurate records of all health care appointments.
    Know if your physician ordered equipment for you.

    For more information:
    - Heath Care Fraud webpage

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    Redemption / Strawman / Bond Fraud

    Proponents of this scheme claim that the U.S. government or the Treasury Department control bank accounts—often referred to as “U.S. Treasury Direct Accounts”—for all U.S. citizens that can be accessed by submitting paperwork with state and federal authorities. Individuals promoting this scam frequently cite various discredited legal theories and may refer to the scheme as “Redemption,” “Strawman,” or “Acceptance for Value.” Trainers and websites will often charge large fees for “kits” that teach individuals how to perpetrate this scheme. They will often imply that others have had great success in discharging debt and purchasing merchandise such as cars and homes. Failures to implement the scheme successfully are attributed to individuals not following instructions in a specific order or not filing paperwork at correct times.

    This scheme predominately uses fraudulent financial documents that appear to be legitimate. These documents are frequently referred to as “bills of exchange,” “promissory bonds,” “indemnity bonds,” “offset bonds,” “sight drafts,” or “comptrollers warrants.” In addition, other official documents are used outside of their intended purpose, like IRS forms 1099, 1099-OID, and 8300. This scheme frequently intermingles legal and pseudo legal terminology in order to appear lawful. Notaries may be used in an attempt to make the fraud appear legitimate. Often, victims of the scheme are instructed to address their paperwork to the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury.

    Tips for Avoiding Redemption/Strawman/Bond Fraud:

    Be wary of individuals or groups selling kits that they claim will inform you on to access secret bank accounts.
    Be wary of individuals or groups proclaiming that paying federal and/or state income tax is not necessary.
    Do not believe that the U.S. Treasury controls bank accounts for all citizens.
    Be skeptical of individuals advocating that speeding tickets, summons, bills, tax notifications, or similar documents can be resolved by writing “acceptance for value” on them.
    If you know of anyone advocating the use of property liens to coerce acceptance of this scheme, contact your local FBI office.

    For more information:
    - Sovereign Citizen Movement
    - Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration: Fact Sheet on Sovereign Citizen Movement

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    Investment-Related Scams

    Letter of Credit Fraud

    Legitimate letters of credit are never sold or offered as investments. They are issued by banks to ensure payment for goods shipped in connection with international trade. Payment on a letter of credit generally requires that the paying bank receive documentation certifying that the goods ordered have been shipped and are en route to their intended destination. Letters of credit frauds are often attempted against banks by providing false documentation to show that goods were shipped when, in fact, no goods or inferior goods were shipped.

    Other letter of credit frauds occur when con artists offer a “letter of credit” or “bank guarantee” as an investment wherein the investor is promised huge interest rates on the order of 100 to 300 percent annually. Such investment “opportunities” simply do not exist. (See Prime Bank Notes for additional information.)

    Tips for Avoiding Letter of Credit Fraud:

    If an “opportunity” appears too good to be true, it probably is.
    Do not invest in anything unless you understand the deal. Con artists rely on complex transactions and faulty logic to “explain” fraudulent investment schemes.
    Do not invest or attempt to “purchase” a “letter of credit.” Such investments simply do not exist.
    Be wary of any investment that offers the promise of extremely high yields.
    Independently verify the terms of any investment that you intend to make, including the parties involved and the nature of the investment.

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    Prime Bank Note Fraud

    International fraud artists have invented an investment scheme that supposedly offers extremely high yields in a relatively short period of time. In this scheme, they claim to have access to “bank guarantees” that they can buy at a discount and sell at a premium. By reselling the “bank guarantees” several times, they claim to be able to produce exceptional returns on investment. For example, if $10 million worth of “bank guarantees” can be sold at a two percent profit on 10 separate occasions—or “traunches”—the seller would receive a 20 percent profit. Such a scheme is often referred to as a “roll program.”

    To make their schemes more enticing, con artists often refer to the “guarantees” as being issued by the world’s “prime banks,” hence the term “prime bank guarantees.” Other official sounding terms are also used, such as “prime bank notes” and “prime bank debentures.” Legal documents associated with such schemes often require the victim to enter into non-disclosure and non-circumvention agreements, offer returns on investment in “a year and a day”, and claim to use forms required by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC). In fact, the ICC has issued a warning to all potential investors that no such investments exist.

    The purpose of these frauds is generally to encourage the victim to send money to a foreign bank, where it is eventually transferred to an off-shore account in the control of the con artist. From there, the victim’s money is used for the perpetrator’s personal expenses or is laundered in an effort to make it disappear.

    While foreign banks use instruments called “bank guarantees” in the same manner that U.S. banks use letters of credit to insure payment for goods in international trade, such bank guarantees are never traded or sold on any kind of market.

    Tips for Avoiding Prime Bank Note Fraud:

    Think before you invest in anything. Be wary of an investment in any scheme, referred to as a “roll program,” that offers unusually high yields by buying and selling anything issued by “prime banks.”
    As with any investment, perform due diligence. Independently verify the identity of the people involved, the veracity of the deal, and the existence of the security in which you plan to invest.
    Be wary of business deals that require non-disclosure or non-circumvention agreements that are designed to prevent you from independently verifying information about the investment.

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    “Ponzi’ Schemes

    “Ponzi” schemes promise high financial returns or dividends not available through traditional investments. Instead of investing the funds of victims, however, the con artist pays “dividends” to initial investors using the funds of subsequent investors. The scheme generally falls apart when the operator flees with all of the proceeds or when a sufficient number of new investors cannot be found to allow the continued payment of “dividends.”

    This type of fraud is named after its creator—Charles Ponzi of Boston, Massachusetts. In the early 1900s, Ponzi launched a scheme that guaranteed investors a 50 percent return on their investment in postal coupons. Although he was able to pay his initial backers, the scheme dissolved when he was unable to pay later investors.

    Tips for Avoiding Ponzi Schemes:

    Be careful of any investment opportunity that makes exaggerated earnings claims.
    Exercise due diligence in selecting investments and the people with whom you invest—in other words, do your homework.
    Consult an unbiased third party—like an unconnected broker or licensed financial advisor—before investing.

    For more information:
    - Bernie Madoff Case
    - Stanford Case
    - Wholesale Grocery Distribution Ponzi Scheme
    - ATM Ponzi Scheme
    - Victims Turn Tables with Ponzi Scheme

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    Pyramid Schemes

    As in Ponzi schemes, the money collected from newer victims of the fraud is paid to earlier victims to provide a veneer of legitimacy. In pyramid schemes, however, the victims themselves are induced to recruit further victims through the payment of recruitment commissions.

    More specifically, pyramid schemes—also referred to as franchise fraud or chain referral schemes—are marketing and investment frauds in which an individual is offered a distributorship or franchise to market a particular product. The real profit is earned, not by the sale of the product, but by the sale of new distributorships. Emphasis on selling franchises rather than the product eventually leads to a point where the supply of potential investors is exhausted and the pyramid collapses. At the heart of each pyramid scheme is typically a representation that new participants can recoup their original investments by inducing two or more prospects to make the same investment. Promoters fail to tell prospective participants that this is mathematically impossible for everyone to do, since some participants drop out, while others recoup their original investments and then drop out.

    Tips for Avoiding Pyramid Schemes:

    Be wary of “opportunities” to invest your money in franchises or investments that require you to bring in subsequent investors to increase your profit or recoup your initial investment.
    Independently verify the legitimacy of any franchise or investment before you invest.

    Market Manipulation or “Pump and Dump” Fraud

    This scheme—commonly referred to as a “pump and dump”—creates artificial buying pressure for a targeted security, generally a low-trading volume issuer in the over-the-counter securities market largely controlled by the fraud perpetrators. This artificially increased trading volume has the effect of artificially increasing the price of the targeted security (i.e., the “pump”), which is rapidly sold off into the inflated market for the security by the fraud perpetrators (i.e., the “dump”); resulting in illicit gains to the perpetrators and losses to innocent third party investors. Typically, the increased trading volume is generated by inducing unwitting investors to purchase shares of the targeted security through false or deceptive sales practices and/or public information releases.

    A modern variation on this scheme involves largely foreign-based computer criminals gaining unauthorized access to the online brokerage accounts of unsuspecting victims in the United States. These victim accounts are then utilized to engage in coordinated online purchases of the targeted security to affect the pump portion of a manipulation, while the fraud perpetrators sell their pre-existing holdings in the targeted security into the inflated market to complete the dump.

    Tips for Avoiding Market Manipulation Fraud:

    Don’t believe the hype.
    Find out where the stock trades.
    Independently verify claims.
    Research the opportunity.
    Beware of high-pressure pitches.
    Always be skeptical.

    For more information:
    - Operation Shore Shells investigation
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  23. #97
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    A few random items:

    Instagram Prepaid Card scam. Buy a prepaid card being told someone can turn $200 in to $2000. They turn your $200 to ZERO.

    News 4 investigates Instagram scam ripping off locals for hundreds | KMOV.com St. Louis

    ===========================================

    To induce victims to invest, Weinstein and others made various types of materially false and misleading statements and omissions. Weinstein and others told victims that Weinstein’s inside access to certain real estate opportunities allowed him to buy a particular piece of property at a below-market price. Weinstein and others also told victims that their money would be used to purchase a specific property, and the property would be quickly resold – or “flipped” – to a third-party purchaser that Weinstein had lined up. Victims were also told that the victims’ money would be held in escrow until the closing of a purported real estate transaction
    Court Blotter: Lakewood Man Admits to $200 Million Investment Fraud Scheme; Money Laundering | the Ocean Signal

    ===========================================
    TIPS ON REAL DUE DILIGENCE BEFORE INVESTING.

    Request the audited financial statements of the company you have or are being asked to invest in. If they have no audited financial statements, walk away;
    Check with the auditor directly to verify the legitimacy of the statements (in at least one recent case, audited statements were forged);
    Conduct online searches on the company and all of its main principals to learn all you can about their background, training and experience;
    If you are being told your money is being

    invested in the particular project, ask to see the relevant documentation;
    Ask the market dealer who is or has solicited you if he/she is licensed, and ask to see a copy of the license;
    Is the person or company offering you the investment registered to sell investments? Confirm by checking the ASC Home website and select the tab "For Investors", then "Check First";
    Also check on ASC Home to see if the company, or its market dealers, have any enforcement record or history with the ASC;
    Check out the company with the Real Estate Council of Alberta (RECA) at Real Estate Council of Alberta - Building Consumer Trust and Confidence to determine if a person or company is authorized by RECA to trade in real estate or deal in mortgages;
    If you have suspicions, ask your lawyer or accountant to investigate on your behalf;
    Beware of promised high returns. Most fraudulent schemes entice their investor/ victims with the promise of significantly above-average returns or dividends (e.g. 10-18%). Initially, these returns may in fact be paid out, but usually out of the proceeds of investments made by subsequent investors (i.e. a "Ponzi" scheme);
    Be wary if you are asked to invest your RRSP money, as this is an area where many fraudulent schemes have been found to operate.
    Protection Against Real Estate Investment Fraud In Alberta - Real Estate and Construction - Canada

    ===========================================
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    State warns of driver's license phone scam, this is in a bunch of states. Government agencies do not call you on the phone or email you for personal information. The elderly are particular targets for this series of scams.

    State warns of driver's license phone scam » Knoxville News Sentinel

    ===========================================

    This scam is going on around the country targeting the elderly. A ruse to get them to give up a credit card number and other details.

    3 On Your Side: Senior Medical Alert Scam « CBS Philly

    ===========================================
    A Sandy Springs man says he paid $20,000 to a person he thought was a lottery representative. In exchange, he was supposed to receive a $200,000 prize.

    But when the 87-year-old man tried to claim his winnings, the alleged scam artist was nowhere to be found, according to police. The victim’s money was gone.
    Man duped out of $20K in lottery scam | www.ajc.com

    ===========================================

    1.JPG
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

  25. #99
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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    Ribshaw was particularly upset to find out this was a scam.

    The websites at the centre of the fraud offered work as “non-sexual” escorts, accompanying clients to business functions and the like.

    Typical of the sites was Candy Escorts, which tempted victims to join with the claim that “we will always have clients in your area”, plus the temptation of work “in more exotic places”.

    There was only one qualification: “All you need to be is great company.” THAT'S ME I THOUGHT.

    After paying the admin fee of between £250 and £450, victims *discovered that there wasn’t any work.

    Check out all the latest News, Sport & Celeb gossip at Mirror.co.uk Bogus dating agency gang finally escorted to jail over £5.7million scam: Andrew Penman investigates - Andrew Penman - Mirror Online
    Follow us: @DailyMirror on Twitter | DailyMirror on Facebook

    2.JPG
    "It's virtually impossible to violate rules ... but it's impossible for a violation to go undetected, certainly not for a considerable period of time." Bernie Madoff
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Scam-...98399986981403

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    Re: Cut and paste snippets about scams.

    SCAMwatch radar: Don’t let your heart be blackmailed

    July 2013: SCAMwatch is again warning those looking for love online to stay on the lookout for scammers.

    SCAMwatch continues to receive complaints about scammers targeting the lonely hearted online, using fake profiles on genuine internet dating sites and online forums to form a relationship with an unsuspecting victim. Once trust is gained, the scammer quickly attempts to move the victim away from the site and its security to communicate and manipulate them into handing over money.

    In a new twist, scammers are blackmailing victims by threatening to send potentially compromising photos or videos to their family and friends if money is not transferred immediately. Scammers will capture photos or videos from webcam chats with the victim and then threaten to post them on public sites. If the scammer has access to their victim’s social network profile, they will also threaten to send the link to the victim’s family and friends. If the victim pays, the scammer may demand further payment before removing the image or video.

    Scammers have a cold heart and will not hesitate to blackmail those seeking love online. Avoid a broken heart, financial losses and embarrassment – don’t share intimate photos or videos with someone that you don’t know and trust.

    How these scams work


    • You meet someone online, such as through a dating or social networking website, whom you seem to ‘connect’ with. The person may claim to have similar likes and dislikes or have gone through similar experiences.
    • Once they have built up trust and a rapport with you – which can take just a few weeks or several months – they profess to have strong feelings for you.
    • They invite you to communicate with them via a webcam. If you agree to chat, they may ask you to share or do something intimate.
    • After the video chat, the scammer informs you that they recorded the chat sessions without your knowledge. They then demand payment, threatening to share the footage with your family and friends via your social networking profile.
    • The scammer may have already posted the video live on public sites and will demand payment in order to remove the footage. The scammer may demand several payments before the footage is taken down.
    • If you don’t send money, the scammer may become more persistent or direct.

    Protect yourself


    • Keep your personal details personal: Never share personal information or photos with someone you don’t know and trust. Be particularly wary if someone invites you to communicate via webcam – these days, it’s easy to record live footage.
    • Watch out: if an online admirer asks to communicate with you outside the dating website, such as through a private email address or over the phone, be wary – they could be a scammer.
    • Think twice: Never send money to a stranger via money order, wire transfer or international funds transfer – it’s rare to recover money sent this way.
    • Report: If you think you have provided your account details to a scammer, contact your bank or financial institution immediately.
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

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